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Author Topic: EP121: The Snow Woman’s Daughter  (Read 14356 times)
Zathras
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« Reply #20 on: September 04, 2007, 08:26:16 AM »


The story was fine, it kept my attention for ~15 minutes.  But like many said before me, I'm looking forward to the fantasy stories getting their own gig.   Good luck to Podcastle!  Smiley
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BionicValkyrie
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« Reply #21 on: September 04, 2007, 09:49:32 PM »

Loved the imagery -- it did seem a bit familiar, maybe, but I like re-tellings and riffs on fairy tales and folklore.  Seems to me that this must have been a pretty dark story for Cricket -- I mean, mother abandoning child, father's dying words reveal his limitations as he provides his daughter the magic word/name to reunite with her mother?
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Kristin
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« Reply #22 on: September 05, 2007, 09:03:55 AM »

Loved the imagery -- it did seem a bit familiar, maybe, but I like re-tellings and riffs on fairy tales and folklore.  Seems to me that this must have been a pretty dark story for Cricket -- I mean, mother abandoning child, father's dying words reveal his limitations as he provides his daughter the magic word/name to reunite with her mother?

I actually looked to see if this was the same Cricket Magazine I remember reading at nine. I do remember reading such stories at that age, it just seems strange to see something like this coming from a youth magazine.
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Listener
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« Reply #23 on: September 05, 2007, 09:10:49 AM »

Having read fantasy similar to this, I know it's not my thing.  But it was a fairy tale, so I really wasn't expecting anything huge to come out of it.

The reading was really good, though.  She changed the voices just enough that you could get the feel she's actually reading you the story, rather than acting it.

Eh.  Not much to say, one way or the other.
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tpi
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« Reply #24 on: September 05, 2007, 01:25:41 PM »

This was very nicely written story which was pleasant to listen.
But it felt kind of empty, and there wasn't really much _real_ content.
It read like a tone-setting piece, like a prologue for a book, where the _real_ action starts later, maybe telling the whole story of the Snow Woman's life.

« Last Edit: September 07, 2007, 05:51:50 AM by tpi » Logged

rani23
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« Reply #25 on: September 05, 2007, 06:23:34 PM »

Hi -- I'm new. Been listening to the podcast for a while (I think I'm finally caught up.)

I think I have to agree with other posters -- it really was not my cup of tea. It was, honestly, a bit too predictable. Cunningminx's voice and delivery was fantastic, as always, however. Smiley

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Reggie
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« Reply #26 on: September 05, 2007, 07:53:11 PM »

Yeah, no argument there about the reading and the actual presentation of the story.

I'm really looking forward to Podcastle.  One more podcast to speed up my day at work, and I'm really excited for some fantasy that steps away from dragons and wizards all the time, or at least puts them in a different setting...

Are there any stories with dragons and wizards on the moon?

 Cheesy
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Monty Grue
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« Reply #27 on: September 07, 2007, 11:42:06 AM »

This would have been a great story to share with kids, especially a young daughter, but I don't have any children, so I'm out of range for its intended primary audience; I'm just too old and too cranky to be amused by fairies and other such nonsense.  Don't get on my case about being a kid at heart or some such gobbledygook.  As the old saying goes: “I have the heart of a little boy.  In a jar of formaldehyde.”

I'm glad the fantasy stories will soon have a home of their own.  I'll subscribe to Castlepod, but will probably skip those Rated G or other fluffy stories.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2007, 11:48:24 AM by Monty Grue » Logged
Rachel Swirsky
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« Reply #28 on: September 08, 2007, 04:02:17 PM »

" I'll subscribe to Castlepod, but will probably skip those Rated G or other fluffy stories."

Do people feel it's the G-rating that demonstrates a story will be more simple? I guess I feel like I've seen a lot of striking stories that would be rated G, but were nevertheless very complex and interesting.

I agree that this particular story was too simplistic for my taste. I wanted it to bring something really special and interesting to the retelling, something I couldn't get by reading a different version of the story. But I wouldn't say the story doesn't suit my taste because it appeared in Cricket; I have been moved by things that appeared in Cricket.

To be clear, I admire some of the craft in this story. It just didn't reach out and grab me.
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Atara
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« Reply #29 on: September 09, 2007, 07:34:03 AM »

I like retellings of folklore stories, but I much prefer it when they have something special, something new to bring to the story. This just didn't seem to have that "something." I'm afraid that I can't quantify exactly what I mean, unfortunately... It's one of those "I know it when I see it" things.

Also, I had a subscription to Cricket when I was a kid; I'm happy to see that it's still around! (Do they still do all the little doodles on the bottom of the pages?) I can completely see this story fitting into Cricket, as that's intended for a slightly older audience (the website says ages 9-14); Ladybug and Spider are the sister magazines meant for younger audiences. I think most 9 yr olds would have no problems with the father's death in this story.
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Monty Grue
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« Reply #30 on: September 09, 2007, 07:53:04 PM »

Quote
Do people feel it's the G-rating that demonstrates a story will be more simple?

Looking over some of the previous G rated stories, “Conversations With and About My Electric Toothbrush” or “Aliens Want Our Women,” I guess it is not always clear that the G rating indicates a children's story.  Whereas this story, the Squonk stories, and some others are mostly for kids, IMHO.  I'm not sure what the solution is, but I'm still likely to pass on these kinds of stories if given fair warning.
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DKT
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« Reply #31 on: September 10, 2007, 12:37:34 PM »

" I'll subscribe to Castlepod, but will probably skip those Rated G or other fluffy stories."

Do people feel it's the G-rating that demonstrates a story will be more simple? I guess I feel like I've seen a lot of striking stories that would be rated G, but were nevertheless very complex and interesting.

Not for me.  I might feel this way about movies in general that are rated G but I don't feel like this about stories podcasted here.  And even with movies, I know there are exceptions (like Pixar).  Sometimes they are simple and straight forward.  So are the R-rated stories.  Sometimes the G-Rated stories affect me far more emotionally than others might. 
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Zathras
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« Reply #32 on: September 10, 2007, 02:23:20 PM »

" I'll subscribe to Castlepod, but will probably skip those Rated G or other fluffy stories."

Do people feel it's the G-rating that demonstrates a story will be more simple? I guess I feel like I've seen a lot of striking stories that would be rated G, but were nevertheless very complex and interesting.

Definitely not. I guess I'm thinking more about sci-fi books I've read than Escape Pod stories.  I've read a ton of books that were great and/or complex that would be considered "G" rated.  Azimov's Foundation series comes to mind.  That would be "G" rated, wouldn't it? 

As far as movies go, my youngest son drags me to most of the "G" movies and I agree that the Pixar ones are usually interesting and complex but many are watered down sludge. 
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DDog
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« Reply #33 on: September 18, 2007, 02:49:56 PM »

I liked this one.

While original ideas are an exciting facet of fiction-writing, there's a difference between copying another's work or writing the same old trite story, and retelling an old tale in your own words. The story of Oedipus, or Antigone, or any of the other great old Greek stories, have been around since the high times of Ancient Greek cultures--were the playwrights of the time plagiarists or trite recyclers to write their plays of those stories? How many thousands of times have the King Arthur stories been told? There are always new ways to incorporate the old timeless concepts and legends, and new writers to tell the old stories with new words. I don't see anything wrong with that.

And for many people who are not versed in Japanese culture, stories of kami and oni are new and fresh, and a modern edition of the tale spreads these stories to new audiences.

Definitely good that PodCastle will have a proper home for these stories soon.

Minx's rendition of the tale was lovely.
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Heradel
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« Reply #34 on: September 18, 2007, 07:35:17 PM »

While original ideas are an exciting facet of fiction-writing, there's a difference between copying another's work or writing the same old trite story, and retelling an old tale in your own words. The story of Oedipus, or Antigone, or any of the other great old Greek stories, have been around since the high times of Ancient Greek cultures--were the playwrights of the time plagiarists or trite recyclers to write their plays of those stories? How many thousands of times have the King Arthur stories been told? There are always new ways to incorporate the old timeless concepts and legends, and new writers to tell the old stories with new words. I don't see anything wrong with that.

We'd have to get rid of most of Shakespeare if we held writers to that standard.
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wakela
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« Reply #35 on: September 18, 2007, 07:37:43 PM »

Quote
There are always new ways to incorporate the old timeless concepts and legends, and new writers to tell the old stories with new words. I don't see anything wrong with that.
I agree that there is nothing wrong with that, except that it makes for an uninteresting, predictable story.
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Heradel
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« Reply #36 on: September 18, 2007, 08:23:30 PM »

Quote
There are always new ways to incorporate the old timeless concepts and legends, and new writers to tell the old stories with new words. I don't see anything wrong with that.
I agree that there is nothing wrong with that, except that it makes for an uninteresting, predictable story.

I disagree. It places a burden on the writer, but even a predictable story can be an interesting and good one. You know that Bond will save the world, that Romeo and Juliet will die, and most of the time Kirk gets the girl. That doesn't stop you from going to see the movie/play/show.
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #37 on: October 07, 2010, 09:10:04 AM »

Not my thing.  For fairy tale retellings, I really want some kind of major change to contrast and compare--a straight up retelling just isn't that interesting to me.

I do like Eugie's writing a lot, I just like it when she starts from scratch.  My all time favorite EP episode is still "Sinner, Baker, Fabulist, Priest; Red Mask, Black Mask, Gentleman, Beast."  Heck, I'd say it's in my top five short stories of all time.
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