Escape Artists
April 21, 2018, 02:51:52 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All
  Print  
Author Topic: PC003: Run Of The Fiery Horse  (Read 37745 times)
sirana
Lochage
*****
Posts: 409



« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2008, 11:45:52 AM »

Damn, that was a great story. One of the best that I've heard in the PseudoEscapePodCastleVerse. Touching upon many interesting themes, based on a very interesting historical and social setting, beautifully constructed and a kick-ass heroine.



Logged
stePH
Actually has enough cowbell.
Hipparch
******
Posts: 3905


Cool story, bro!


WWW
« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2008, 11:47:22 AM »


It is very, very difficult to find good high fantasy and sword and sorcery stories. Most of what we see in slush are purple prosed Tolkein rip-offs.
I'm not sure what "purple-prosed" means, but if the Tolkien rip-offs are nevertheless good stories, I'd still like to hear them. But by "rip-offs," do you mean more or less the type of world they are set in (not an issue for me), or that a hobbit an elf finds this ring sword that needs to be destroyed before Sauron the Master of Darkness can get his hands on it (yeah, a bit of an issue).

Do we use the term "EFP" here?
Logged

"Nerdcore is like playing Halo while getting a blow-job from Hello Kitty."
-- some guy interviewed in Nerdcore Rising
sirana
Lochage
*****
Posts: 409



« Reply #22 on: April 16, 2008, 11:48:39 AM »

My 2 Eurocents on the feminism issue (which clearly beat your American cents, since the Euro stands at about 1.6 $):
I didn't think that either "Come Lady, Death" (which I loved) or "For Fear of Dragons" (which I didn't like) are about feminism or female empowerment at all. Imho, the first doesn't have a political or social message at all and the second is anti-religion or anti-establishment.
This story definitely has a component female empowerment , but I'd argue that it is not at the core of the story. It is only the reason why she strikes a deal with the snake demon. After that the story is about her conflict with the EVIL MONSTERtm which I don't read as feminist or political at all.     
Logged
sirana
Lochage
*****
Posts: 409



« Reply #23 on: April 16, 2008, 11:53:10 AM »

Oh and before I forget, the self-deprecating humor in the outro made me laugh out loud. Gooooo Rachel!
Logged
Heradel
Bill Peters, EP Assistant
Hipparch
******
Posts: 2938


Part-Time Psychopomp.


« Reply #24 on: April 16, 2008, 12:07:20 PM »

Do we use the term "EFP" here?

Explosively Formed Penetrator? Not usually. I prefer the naturally formed ones myself.
Logged

I Twitter. I also occasionally blog on the Escape Pod blog, which if you're here you shouldn't have much trouble finding.
stePH
Actually has enough cowbell.
Hipparch
******
Posts: 3905


Cool story, bro!


WWW
« Reply #25 on: April 16, 2008, 12:16:21 PM »

Do we use the term "EFP" here?

Explosively Formed Penetrator? Not usually. I prefer the naturally formed ones myself.

I mean Extruded Fantasy Product.  Like Eragon for example.
Logged

"Nerdcore is like playing Halo while getting a blow-job from Hello Kitty."
-- some guy interviewed in Nerdcore Rising
ChloeH
Extern
*
Posts: 11



« Reply #26 on: April 16, 2008, 12:17:37 PM »

Just wanted to throw in my thoughts on this one. This is my first post on an episode so please forgive me if my skills at putting my thoughts on paper hard to follow.

I loved this story. I have always had a fondness for asian folktales and this story had the same feel. The idea of winning through submission is a common theme. I thought this was hinted at and revealed very well through her dealings with the courtasans. She gave the serpent everything he wanted and he choked on his own desires. Very nice.

I see what several people had mean by there being a "female empowerment theme" but I think it's really too early in PodCastle's life to say if it will continue.

Thank you for a good tale, well told.
Logged
Russell Nash
Guest
« Reply #27 on: April 16, 2008, 12:35:15 PM »

Just wanted to throw in my thoughts on this one. This is my first post on an episode so please forgive me if my skills at putting my thoughts on paper hard to follow.

I have no idea how you do with paper, but you get your point across with electrons.


Edit: fixed typo
« Last Edit: April 16, 2008, 02:01:26 PM by Russell Nash » Logged
Listener
Hipparch
******
Posts: 3187


I place things in locations which later elude me.


WWW
« Reply #28 on: April 16, 2008, 12:41:15 PM »

It is very, very difficult to find good high fantasy and sword and sorcery stories. Most of what we see in slush are purple prosed Tolkein rip-offs.
I'm not sure what "purple-prosed" means, but if the Tolkien rip-offs are nevertheless good stories, I'd still like to hear them. But by "rip-offs," do you mean more or less the type of world they are set in (not an issue for me), or that a hobbit an elf finds this ring sword that needs to be destroyed before Sauron the Master of Darkness can get his hands on it (yeah, a bit of an issue).

I believe it was Elmore Leonard (I could be wrong) who recently posted on a blog or something about how the only word you need to tag dialogue is "said", and that you should either use that or nothing at all.  Since I read that last year, I have been nigh-obsessive about using "said" unless the character was indeed yelling, shouting, screaming, whispering, and sometimes I still go with said and instead describe the person's voice.

The biggest recent offender of purple-prose-ism, in my mind, is JK Rowling, culminating in a scene in "Order of the Phoenix" where Ron, upset, "ejaculated" his words.  I about peed myself in hilarity.

Interestingly, this morning I just watched episode 1x03 of "Californication", and this phrase was used.  Go fig.
Logged

"Farts are a hug you can smell." -Wil Wheaton

Blog || Quote Blog ||  Written and Audio Work || Twitter: @listener42
deflective
Hipparch
******
Posts: 1171



« Reply #29 on: April 16, 2008, 01:53:40 PM »

The serpent - who was sexually attracted to the girl - was making her father dream of her in an inappropriate manner...

well said. even more accurately, it was the part of the serpent that was once her suitor.


i don't want to distract from the story but don't want to leave the overriding podcastle discussion either. it's continued in fantasy women.
Logged
Bdoomed
Pseudopod Tiger
Moderator
*****
Posts: 4836


Mmm. Tiger.


« Reply #30 on: April 16, 2008, 01:59:07 PM »

Just wanted to throw in my thoughts on this one. This is my first post on an episode so please forgive me if my skills at putting my thoughts on paper hard to follow.

I have no idea how you do with paper, but your get your point across with electrons.
Cheesy yaaay! i was going to say something to that effect.

fantasy women sounds dirty
« Last Edit: April 16, 2008, 02:00:44 PM by Bdoomed » Logged

I'd like to hear my options, so I could weigh them, what do you say?
Five pounds?  Six pounds? Seven pounds?
eytanz
Moderator
*****
Posts: 5889



« Reply #31 on: April 16, 2008, 02:07:14 PM »

The serpent - who was sexually attracted to the girl - was making her father dream of her in an inappropriate manner...

well said. even more accurately, it was the part of the serpent that was once her suitor.

I don't think so. The serpent's attraction to the girl was pretty sexual even before he ate the suitor (indeed, he ate the suitor out of jealousy). And the suitor was a nice, gentle guy.
Logged
deflective
Hipparch
******
Posts: 1171



« Reply #32 on: April 16, 2008, 03:00:34 PM »

i seem to remember a passage where the serpent found himself unsettled about new feelings after he had after consuming the suitor. there was something about the movement of her body when she ran.

and i resent the implication that a nice guy doesn't notice a woman's skin =p
Logged
ajames
Lochage
*****
Posts: 358



« Reply #33 on: April 17, 2008, 05:32:51 AM »

The ending confused me slightly -- not the climax, where Tsi Sha basically punched his own ticket, but where Li Chi ran off into the dream world.  I'd like to know what happened when she got out of there... or if she did.  I can't remember the exact quote, but someone once said that the world in which you hold your reader is ephemeral, that the characters have lives to get back to after you're done with them, and a good story lets them do that and makes you wonder what's outside the covers of the book.  (I'm paraphrasing.)

The ending definitely left me with questions, too. After wondering a bit about what happened next, I thought perhaps it was better to end the story this way - we know Li Chi is free to run, and that's the main thing.
Logged
Russell Nash
Guest
« Reply #34 on: April 17, 2008, 06:26:59 AM »

The ending confused me slightly -- not the climax, where Tsi Sha basically punched his own ticket, but where Li Chi ran off into the dream world.  I'd like to know what happened when she got out of there... or if she did.  I can't remember the exact quote, but someone once said that the world in which you hold your reader is ephemeral, that the characters have lives to get back to after you're done with them, and a good story lets them do that and makes you wonder what's outside the covers of the book.  (I'm paraphrasing.)

The ending definitely left me with questions, too. After wondering a bit about what happened next, I thought perhaps it was better to end the story this way - we know Li Chi is free to run, and that's the main thing.

If she's left running in this world that was inside the spirit snake, how long can that world last?  If she doesn't get back to the real world, isn't it over for her or isn't she at least all alone?
Logged
eytanz
Moderator
*****
Posts: 5889



« Reply #35 on: April 17, 2008, 06:36:14 AM »

The ending confused me slightly -- not the climax, where Tsi Sha basically punched his own ticket, but where Li Chi ran off into the dream world.  I'd like to know what happened when she got out of there... or if she did.  I can't remember the exact quote, but someone once said that the world in which you hold your reader is ephemeral, that the characters have lives to get back to after you're done with them, and a good story lets them do that and makes you wonder what's outside the covers of the book.  (I'm paraphrasing.)

The ending definitely left me with questions, too. After wondering a bit about what happened next, I thought perhaps it was better to end the story this way - we know Li Chi is free to run, and that's the main thing.

If she's left running in this world that was inside the spirit snake, how long can that world last?  If she doesn't get back to the real world, isn't it over for her or isn't she at least all alone?

My interpretation of the ending was that she was no longer within the snake, but she was still asleep and dreaming. I think it was meant to show that from now on her dreams are going to be happy. She will presumably wake up in the morning, but her real life will never be perfect - as an adult, she can no longer run freely, she will unlikely find a man who would make her happy, and so forth. But without the serpent, her spirit is now totally free whenever she dreams.
Logged
Ramsey
Extern
*
Posts: 9



WWW
« Reply #36 on: April 17, 2008, 10:32:52 AM »

The ending does seem a bit incongruous, but the line before last, "... the whole of the dreamlands lay before her ..." left me feeling that since she had defeated the dreamstalker she's somehow inherited the "dreamlands" over which he had reigned. Although, mostly, the point was probably just that she is now, free from her deal with the serpent, able to run to her heart's content.
Logged
Biscuit
Peltast
***
Posts: 113


« Reply #37 on: April 17, 2008, 09:32:32 PM »

Always great discussion before I get here Wink

Ok, I only have one word for this story:

Beautiful.
Logged

Thaurismunths
High Priest of TCoRN
Hipparch
******
Posts: 1420


Praise N-sh, for it is right and good!


« Reply #38 on: April 18, 2008, 05:35:28 AM »

The ending does seem a bit incongruous, but the line before last, "... the whole of the dreamlands lay before her ..." left me feeling that since she had defeated the dreamstalker she's somehow inherited the "dreamlands" over which he had reigned. Although, mostly, the point was probably just that she is now, free from her deal with the serpent, able to run to her heart's content.
That's very much how I took the ending.
She destroyed the dreamstalker at his root, and now if she doesn't become the new dreamstalker then she at least has the powers to visit other peoples' dreams.

Oh and before I forget, the self-deprecating humor in the outro made me laugh out loud. Gooooo Rachel!
Totally overlooked, but absolutely right.
Great intros and outros.
Logged

How do you fight a bully that can un-make history?
Tango Alpha Delta
Hipparch
******
Posts: 1764



WWW
« Reply #39 on: April 18, 2008, 07:00:36 AM »

Brilliant story; thank you for "running" it.  Wink


As for the female empowerment theme, this story is a great example of doing it right.  The story is not "about" female empowerment - it is about the individual being true to their nature. 

Tsi Sha symbolized the male tendency to treat his conquests as prey - note that it wasn't about sex until he took human form - and while I got the impression that he didn't need to devour spirits in order to appreciate them, he felt he had to or risk having them "get away". 

You might argue (as Tsi Sha would argue) that it was "his nature" to devour them, but in fact, devouring his prey was an act of cowardice.  If he had been willing to risk losing Li Chi by sparing her (and not trying to dominate her), he would not have been destroyed.  They might have had a "happy ever after" ending!  (Not that we want THAT in a fantasy podcast! Wink )

And while a few of you claim to have seen the end coming, I wasn't sure until the "consummation" that we were going there.  Until that point, Tsi Sha could have decided to let Li Chi go, and spent her lifetime "enjoying her spirit"; after devouring Po Ta, he might have realized the wisdom of that approach.  I recognize a bit of Po Ta in myself, and my wife (who is a dragon, fwiw) certainly has a spirit that defies domination.  If I tried to dominate her (as many have suggested I should do over the years) we would NOT get along, and we would not be as happy as we are.

It is this sense of balance that appeals to me in Amy Tan's books, as well (though her stories are far darker than this one was).
Logged

This Wiki Won't Wrangle Itself!

I finally published my book - Tad's Happy Funtime is on Amazon!
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!