Author Topic: fantasy women  (Read 42259 times)

stePH

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Re: fantasy women
« Reply #40 on: April 22, 2008, 08:00:24 AM »
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does anyone have suggestions for favourite stories/books with a distinctly female voice? ideally without the victimization hotbutton, but variety's the key.

Just from the Brit thing, you might enjoy Susannah Clarke's Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell (I've probably biffed that title. Anyone want to help?)

That's the correct title, but I don't think there's anything particularly "female" about the voice in that book.

Maybe Marion Zimmer Bradley, or Andre Norton, or C. J. Cherryh?

I'm very fond of Cherryh and have most of her books (some still unread though).  Actually I'm only fond of her science fiction -- I read Faery in Shadow and only got through it by reminding myself that every page turned brought me that much closer to the end.  I'll give her fantasy another try with Fortress or The Dreaming Tree before I write it off entirely.
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DKT

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Re: fantasy women
« Reply #41 on: April 22, 2008, 11:31:46 AM »
I would recommend Marion Zimmer Bradley, but probably not to Deflective.  At least not the ones I've read. 

I thought Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell was an excellent read, but I agree with StePH.  Aside from being written by a woman in a breezy Jane Austen-esque voice, it doesn't really focus on any female characters.  I really like what I've read by Naomi Novick, but again -- the book I've read focuses on a guy. 

Are you looking for straight fantasy, Deflective?  Or are you open to SF as well?  I would definitely recommend Elizabeth Bear's Hammered -- I liked it enough to buy the other other two in the series the next time I was at the bookstore (have not, unfortunately read any of her fantasy books).

eytanz

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Re: fantasy women
« Reply #42 on: April 22, 2008, 02:06:16 PM »
I thought Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell was an excellent read, but I agree with StePH.  Aside from being written by a woman in a breezy Jane Austen-esque voice, it doesn't really focus on any female characters.  I really like what I've read by Naomi Novick, but again -- the book I've read focuses on a guy. 

I don't think a "female voice" is the same as "about female characters". I would think it's quite possible to have a novel with a "female voice" about men (and I agree that Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell is one), just as it is possible to write a novel with a "male voice" about women.

hautdesert

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Re: fantasy women
« Reply #43 on: April 22, 2008, 02:20:29 PM »
I don't think a "female voice" is the same as "about female characters". I would think it's quite possible to have a novel with a "female voice" about men (and I agree that Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell is one), just as it is possible to write a novel with a "male voice" about women.

I agree.  I think the voice of Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell is pretty perceptibly female.  And I agree that "from a female perspective" doesn't neccesarily equal "focusing on women."

Cherryh is definitely worth reading--stepH knew I'd agree on that--though like stepH my personal favorites are the science fiction ones.  I myself read way more Andre Norton in my youth than was probably good for me.  Most of the Witch World novels are great fun, at least in my opinion.  My personal faves would be The Crystal Gryphon and The Jargoon Pard with The Year of the Unicorn and the trilogy (Three Against the Witch World, Warlock of the Witch World, Sorceress of the Witch World) ranked just behind.  Of course, that was a taste that was firmly established when I was quite young, so it may or may not hold up for adult readers.

I haven't read Naomi Novik, but I've heard good things.  I've spent so much time reading short fiction the past couple of years, it's hard for me to bring recent novel titles to mind.  I'm going to have to remedy that.

DKT

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Re: fantasy women
« Reply #44 on: April 22, 2008, 03:08:05 PM »
I thought Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell was an excellent read, but I agree with StePH.  Aside from being written by a woman in a breezy Jane Austen-esque voice, it doesn't really focus on any female characters.  I really like what I've read by Naomi Novick, but again -- the book I've read focuses on a guy. 

I don't think a "female voice" is the same as "about female characters". I would think it's quite possible to have a novel with a "female voice" about men (and I agree that Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell is one), just as it is possible to write a novel with a "male voice" about women.

You're absolutely right.  I meant to just make the distinction between a female voice and a story that focuses on a female character, because I wasn't sure if Deflective was looking for one or the other or both.  But I may not have been clear enough.  Thanks.

stePH

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Re: fantasy women
« Reply #45 on: April 22, 2008, 03:53:24 PM »
I think the voice of Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell is pretty perceptibly female. 

Perhaps it's just because I'm male and totally insensitive to this sort of thing :) but I never notice literature as having a "male" or "female" "voice".  I have trouble distinguishing an authorial "voice" at all.

(Of course it probably doesn't help that rather than read this book, I listened to the audio which was read by Simon Prebble.)
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Roney

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Re: fantasy women
« Reply #46 on: April 22, 2008, 06:41:53 PM »
If we're recommending fantasy novels by female authors with distinctive voices, I've recently been enjoying the work of Steph Swainston.

(Moderators, feel free to sort out the link.)
« Last Edit: April 22, 2008, 08:32:11 PM by Bdoomed »

Heradel

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Re: fantasy women
« Reply #47 on: April 22, 2008, 06:56:01 PM »
If we're recommending fantasy novels by female authors with distinctive voices, I've recently been enjoying the work of Steph Swainston.

(Moderators, feel free to sort out the link.)

Unfortunately the affiliate system only works with individual items, not the results of a search.
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deflective

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Re: fantasy women
« Reply #48 on: April 22, 2008, 07:25:33 PM »
Just from the Brit thing, you might enjoy Susannah Clarke's Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell

i jogged down to the local library to pick up a copy. holy stack of paper! it was like weight training on the way home.

I'm very fond of Cherryh and have most of her books

i was surprised to find the chanur novels when i looked her up. some time ago i read the first one but didn't realize there was an option to keep going. space faring lions, what's not to like? =)

Are you looking for straight fantasy, Deflective?  Or are you open to SF as well?

anything you think appropriate really, especially if it highlights a point you want to talk about. i'll check out hammered once i start catching up.

deflective

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Re: fantasy women
« Reply #49 on: April 24, 2008, 08:53:05 PM »
I would definitely recommend Elizabeth Bear's Hammered

it's easy to understand why after hearing tideline