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Author Topic: PC005: The Ant King: A California Fairy Tale  (Read 47221 times)

Schreiber

  • Peltast
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  • Posts: 129
Reply #75 on: July 21, 2008, 11:10:25 PM
It's where Squonk belongs.  It's his home.



Unblinking

  • Sir Postsalot
  • Hipparch
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  • Posts: 8729
    • Diabolical Plots
Reply #76 on: January 07, 2010, 09:29:48 PM
This one started off great with the gumball transmutation, and I was really looking forward to seeing his confrontation with the Ant King.  But then for a looong time after that it described his dealing with the company, how he was getting edged out of every responsibility and didn't seem in the slightest bit concerned about it.  I found it really hard to keep interested in that, not only because he was just blindly accepting whatever fate the others relegated him to, but he was not questing to rescue his wife. 

Unfortunately I think I missed most or all of the gamer jokes by turning it off early.  I was a little younger than their demographic at the time that most of the text adventures came out, but I saw my older brother playing them, and I'm a big enthusiast for retro gaming.  Too many recent video game releases are all just flash with no substance, and it's fun to play some of the old-school games when there was no flashy graphics to bring the consumers in by the truckload.  At the moment I'm trying to work my way through Bureaucracy (a text game written by Douglas Adams) and also Eric the Unready (a graphical adventure of the early 90s). 




yicheng

  • Matross
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  • Posts: 221
Reply #77 on: August 03, 2010, 02:49:08 PM
I was a little surprised at the love-it-or-hate-it feedback here.  I personally loved this story, and it remains one of my favorite Podcastles.  I've never worked in LA, but at where I used to live (Arizona), we get a lot of the Westcoast-Corporate cultural influence.  It's not quite so exaggerated as the story portrays, but it's not too far off the mark.  I've worked with a few people that were eerily similar to Vampire and Corpse.  The only character that seemed to be unrealistic was the Monique character.  The sprinkling of gamer reference was hilarious as well.

I also appreciated the alliteration of the Greek Myths, particular that of Orpheus descending into Hades (with a roach for a Cerebus).



nzelnick

  • Extern
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  • Posts: 2
Reply #78 on: October 04, 2010, 06:54:39 PM
OK--Benjamin Rosenbaum is definitely not for the casual (or causal--possibly not even coastal) reader nor for the faint (or feint) of heart (or hart). This story runs on pure loopiness for awhile put really pays off in the end. You'll need to suspend belief, disbelief, unbelief--hell, suspension just leaves 'em all out on the street and that's dangerous...better to just send all of those unproven bastards to detention.

As with Rosenbaum's ""Biographical Notes to ‘A Discourse on the Nature of Causality, with Air-Planes’, by Benjamin Rosenbaum" by Benjamin Rosenbaum" either you're gonna love the meta stuff or its going to make the back of your head hurt in that special way that comes just before brains burst out.

If this sort of thing is your cuppa brains, though, may I strongly recommend reading "Feeling Very Strange: The Slipstream Anthology" details here: http://www.librarything.com/work/930149

NateZ