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Author Topic: EP156: Distant Replay  (Read 24926 times)
CGFxColONeill
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« Reply #60 on: May 08, 2008, 08:18:53 AM »

my favorite quote on that is here Yogi Berra

Stepping in here as a moderator.  When you're referring to a seven word quote, just put in the quote instead of linking to a page where the quote is down the page.  It just makes things a little easier.
thanks for the tip
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« Reply #61 on: May 09, 2008, 08:40:16 AM »

An old man just lost his wife of many decades, and then he randomly sees a young woman looks just like his wife at that age.

I thought she had died a few years back.
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« Reply #62 on: May 09, 2008, 08:43:19 AM »

An old man just lost his wife of many decades, and then he randomly sees a young woman looks just like his wife at that age.

I thought she had died a few years back.

They were married for decades.
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wintermute
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« Reply #63 on: May 09, 2008, 09:36:35 AM »

An old man just lost his wife of many decades, and then he randomly sees a young woman looks just like his wife at that age.

I thought she had died a few years back.

They were married for decades.

But he hadn't "just" lost her.
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« Reply #64 on: May 09, 2008, 10:56:11 AM »

Wow. I'm shocked at the positive feedback to be honest. I thought this was a very mediocre story. My first reaction was "That got nominated for a Hugo?Huh?".  Ignoring the fact that it isn't even science fiction, the story managed to combine trite sentimentality with a lack of narrative drive and a predictable ending. The second Walter got his death sentence from the Doc I knew where the story was headed.  I also just didn't like Walter that much - he's such an empty man. If your love for a woman consumes you to the point that you don't appear to have any real outside interests, hobbies or friends than that's a very unhealthy solipsistic  sort of love. It didn't help that the narration sounded like a younger person's imitation of a man in his 70s, not like a man in his 70s.

The really interesting angle of this story got missed in all Walter's self-pitying monologue - young Dierdre and Walter must really be sort of alienated outsiders in our era. While the original versions were very much people of their era, who are these early 30 year olds who apparently wear early 1960s fashions and whose aesthetic taste is trapped in the 50s? The "copies" seem like they are much more interesting than the "originals", yet we don't learn a lot about them.
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Roney
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« Reply #65 on: May 09, 2008, 01:38:23 PM »


My first reaction was "That got nominated for a Hugo?Huh?".




Not quite my first reaction, but it's the one that lingers.  It's a cute story, very skilfully told, occasionally moving, and paced nicely so as not to drag out the revelations that the reader has already guessed.  It may even be one of the best short stories of 2007 (not having read many new stories last year I wouldn't like to say).  But if that's the best Speculative Fiction of last year then I think the genre needs to take a long look at what makes its stories different from the rest of literature.



Quote

The really interesting angle of this story got missed in all Walter's self-pitying monologue - young Dierdre and Walter must really be sort of alienated outsiders in our era. While the original versions were very much people of their era, who are these early 30 year olds who apparently wear early 1960s fashions and whose aesthetic taste is trapped in the 50s?




That thought kept distracting me too.
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DKT
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« Reply #66 on: May 09, 2008, 01:40:59 PM »


Quote

The really interesting angle of this story got missed in all Walter's self-pitying monologue - young Dierdre and Walter must really be sort of alienated outsiders in our era. While the original versions were very much people of their era, who are these early 30 year olds who apparently wear early 1960s fashions and whose aesthetic taste is trapped in the 50s?




That thought kept distracting me too.

I did think about that some, especially when young Walter called old Walter "Fella."
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stePH
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Cool story, bro!


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« Reply #67 on: May 09, 2008, 02:02:15 PM »

The really interesting angle of this story got missed in all Walter's self-pitying monologue - young Dierdre and Walter must really be sort of alienated outsiders in our era. While the original versions were very much people of their era, who are these early 30 year olds who apparently wear early 1960s fashions and whose aesthetic taste is trapped in the 50s?

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« Last Edit: May 09, 2008, 02:03:53 PM by stePH » Logged

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« Reply #68 on: May 15, 2008, 04:31:05 AM »

Good Lord that Mr. Anderson can read a story. Here's hoping he takes the blue pill so he can read again, eh?
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zZzacha
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« Reply #69 on: May 15, 2008, 06:41:37 AM »

Wow, wonderful story. I really love Mike Resnick Stories. Barnaby in Exile was superb! I want more of those :]  Bring 'em on!!!

Also, great to hear from the master himself how he came to write this story. Gives the story even more depth IMHO.
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« Reply #70 on: May 15, 2008, 09:24:48 AM »

Fantastic story, excellent reading, A+!

I was engaged instantly, the story kept my complete attention until the last word, and gave me plenty to think about afterwards. Three cheers for Escape Pod!
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Roland
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« Reply #71 on: May 18, 2008, 03:56:14 AM »

While the narration was excellent and I can see that there is a good story there, it just did not spark any interest in me.
So I think it was down to my own tastes rather than being a poor story that I found it boring.
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multikay
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« Reply #72 on: May 29, 2008, 10:01:44 AM »

Sadly, I have to agree with those who dislike the story. All the time while listening to this I hade the terrible vision how this story would spawn a movie directed by Norah Ephron, starring Kevin Costner and Gwyneth Paltrow. This actually makes me wonder how on earth stories get nominated for a Hugo ...
« Last Edit: May 29, 2008, 10:03:35 AM by multikay » Logged
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« Reply #73 on: July 02, 2008, 01:20:20 PM »

I thought it was okay and then I read the break down in here and decided it was claaaaaap!

I know I am a newb and totally behind on the stories... but if I may:

The old dude was totally creepy.  And YES, there is a fine line.  If the person is hot/cool it is a boyfriend/girlfriend, otherwise it is a stalker. =)

The chick was a total slut, just look at what she was wearing.  She was asking for it. 

Seriously, is it REALLY that hard to find somebody?  I guess if you believe in the whole "soul mate" thing.. well.  I think that is sad and incredibly limiting.  How many people do you know that are together that didn’t like the first impression of the other?  And perhaps I am alone, but who I "like" changes from moment to moment.  But most of the time a good fart joke is the ticket. 

I think this is just a story to make people that won’t settle for that special anyone to break out the tissues.
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« Reply #74 on: July 11, 2008, 03:25:14 AM »

(is that a generation thing? Has the media primed us to find a creep in every seeming good deed

You know, I didn't really have time today to respond to Anarkey properly, and I was sort of hoping Rain would post as well, but I agree with this worry, as well as with what TAD posted. It seems to me, especially after reading Anarkey's post, that to interpret the man's actions as creepy we need to be subconciously primed for an excuse to do so - it is a reflection of a society where basic human interaction is discouraged outside of very narrowly prescribed social bounderies, where an old man taking any type of interest in a younger woman, for whatever reason, is viewed with suspicion and possible disgust. Where any overture which is not immediately welcomed is viewed as unwelcome attention. Where openness is interpreted as either vulnerability or creepiness, depending on who exhibits it.

Not, mind you, that I'm saying that that is Anarkey's attitude, or Rain's attitude. What I'm saying is that that is the underlying current in our society, and that it affects all our attitudes to some degree.
That it does.

I'm a guy, 55 years old, and pretty much look it. About a year and a half ago, I was driving to work as usual on a back road that cuts off a few hundred meters from my route, and is generally less populated and more scenic (farm, cow pasture, hayfields, etc.) than the main road. I see this girl jogging. I recognise her as the fairly attractive teenage daughter, Melanie, of my wife's good friend Donna. We had met her at odd times when we visited Donna. Melanie was on the high school soccer team, and I figured the running was part of her training. I give a brief wave as I pass her. Then it seemed that every morning I would pass her at about the same place, like clockwork. She'd give this shy little wave as I passed, and I'd wave back. Last spring, she didn't show up for a few months, and I knew that Melanie had graduated and would be going to university about 200 km away. I figured she went early, for a summer job or something. Then one day in the early fall, I saw her running again - same time, same general area. We waved.

A few days later I was talking to Donna on the phone and asked her if Melanie had been home for the weekend. Donna said "no, why?" I explained about us waving to each other while I was driving to work on that back road. It turns out that the young woman I had been waving to was somebody else entirely. A total stranger, except for our waving ritual. I've never seen her in other places, such as the local grocery store, or at least I've never recognized her anywhere else.

Now I'm left with this conundrum. I have this vague need to explain myself or or apologize or something to this stranger, since the ritual began as a result of a misunderstanding on my part. Do I...
A. Stop waving back and ignore her from now on. (seems rude)
B. Keep waving as usual. (seems ... I dunno what)
C. Stop the car when I see her (on the deserted back road), roll down the window as she passes and start talking to her, to explain myself. (prepare to be pepper-sprayed?)

I've been primed to be aware that "option C." could make me seem creepy, especially if she decided to just keep running without hearing what I said. I wouldn't be able to try it again without scaring her. She might feel a need to change her route.
Maybe I could prepare a note and toss it out just before we pass each other, hoping that she'd pick it up and read after I drove by, but that just seems too weird, even to me.

The only thing I can figure might work is to find some other woman who also runs (hey, I know one who trains for marathons!) and who might know who the mystery runner is (it's a small town). I explain the situation to her, and she tells the mystery woman what's going on, and we merely continue with option B.

It all makes me feel like I'm in an episode of Seinfield.
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Russell Nash
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« Reply #75 on: July 11, 2008, 05:39:30 AM »

I'm a guy, 55 years old, and pretty much look it. About a year and a half ago, I was driving to work as usual on a back road that cuts off a few hundred meters from my route, and is generally less populated and more scenic (farm, cow pasture, hayfields, etc.) than the main road. I see this girl jogging. I recognise her as the fairly attractive teenage daughter, Melanie, of my wife's good friend Donna. We had met her at odd times when we visited Donna. Melanie was on the high school soccer team, and I figured the running was part of her training. I give a brief wave as I pass her. Then it seemed that every morning I would pass her at about the same place, like clockwork. She'd give this shy little wave as I passed, and I'd wave back. Last spring, she didn't show up for a few months, and I knew that Melanie had graduated and would be going to university about 200 km away. I figured she went early, for a summer job or something. Then one day in the early fall, I saw her running again - same time, same general area. We waved.

A few days later I was talking to Donna on the phone and asked her if Melanie had been home for the weekend. Donna said "no, why?" I explained about us waving to each other while I was driving to work on that back road. It turns out that the young woman I had been waving to was somebody else entirely. A total stranger, except for our waving ritual. I've never seen her in other places, such as the local grocery store, or at least I've never recognized her anywhere else.

Now I'm left with this conundrum. I have this vague need to explain myself or or apologize or something to this stranger, since the ritual began as a result of a misunderstanding on my part. Do I...
A. Stop waving back and ignore her from now on. (seems rude)
B. Keep waving as usual. (seems ... I dunno what)
C. Stop the car when I see her (on the deserted back road), roll down the window as she passes and start talking to her, to explain myself. (prepare to be pepper-sprayed?)

I've been primed to be aware that "option C." could make me seem creepy, especially if she decided to just keep running without hearing what I said. I wouldn't be able to try it again without scaring her. She might feel a need to change her route.
Maybe I could prepare a note and toss it out just before we pass each other, hoping that she'd pick it up and read after I drove by, but that just seems too weird, even to me.

The only thing I can figure might work is to find some other woman who also runs (hey, I know one who trains for marathons!) and who might know who the mystery runner is (it's a small town). I explain the situation to her, and she tells the mystery woman what's going on, and we merely continue with option B.

It all makes me feel like I'm in an episode of Seinfield.

Planish,

That would be a funny as hell story written from both sides.  You'd need to talk to a few different women to get the runner's reaction/thinking right. 
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Darwinist
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« Reply #76 on: July 11, 2008, 08:34:59 AM »


A. Stop waving back and ignore her from now on. (seems rude)
B. Keep waving as usual. (seems ... I dunno what)
C. Stop the car when I see her (on the deserted back road), roll down the window as she passes and start talking to her, to explain myself. (prepare to be pepper-sprayed?)

It all makes me feel like I'm in an episode of Seinfield.

I would go with "B" by process of elimination.  I guess I would err on the side of friendliness and keep waving rather than cutting her off or stopping the car and making a bigger deal out of it.  If you ever run in to her at the grocery store or gas station you can explain that she looks like someone else you know.  And I don't think it is all that weird, I run several times a week in the mornings and there are some other people out that I always meet but don't know and we always exchange a "Hi" or "Good Morning".  Good luck! 
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Ocicat
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« Reply #77 on: July 11, 2008, 04:56:35 PM »

waving at strangers -> not bad

stopping to explain why you're waving -> potentially creepy
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Planish
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« Reply #78 on: July 12, 2008, 03:27:41 AM »

That would be a funny as hell story written from both sides.  You'd need to talk to a few different women to get the runner's reaction/thinking right. 

Something like an O. Henry/Saki pastiche?

It could be difficult. I'd have to present her side in such a way that doesn't tip off the reader that she is not Melanie. Without the surprise element of me finally realising that she was someone else, I think it would be somewhat lame.
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« Reply #79 on: August 20, 2010, 11:57:38 AM »

This was one of those Hugo noms where I just didn't understand how it got nominated in the first place.  I think Resnick has been nominated pretty much every year for a good long time now, and when I like a story by him I REALLY like it.  But some years it seems like his story is nominated because a Resnick story is always nominated, not because they're any better than hundreds of other stories that year.

It was an okay love story.  Resnick's good at pulling out emotions, but this time the puppetmaster was just way too visible for me.  I could tell exactly where I was SUPPOSED to feel each reaction.  And because it was a Hugo nom, my expectations were higher.

It didn't make sense to me that the old and young versions dressed the same and liked the same movies.  All the hints were that they were essentially the same people in every meaningful way, but the context of the young man loving the old movies is very different from an old man loving old movies.  that didn't make any sense to me.

I usually love this readers voice, but in this story he could've dialed it down a few notches.  He's good at conveying emotions, but the emotions were laid on so thick this time that every word dripped with angst.  If there's no contrast between one part of the story and another then it conveys no change of emotion, and the constant thick emotion becomes distracting.  For me, it was so strong and so sustained that it went right past believable and into satirical exaggeration.  If he'd used that voice only at a select passage or two when he's feeling particularly strongly, then it could've been a real benefit to the reading. 
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