Escape Artists
December 17, 2017, 10:24:29 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4  All
  Print  
Author Topic: PC011: Fourteen Experiments In Postal Delivery  (Read 20036 times)
stePH
Actually has enough cowbell.
Hipparch
******
Posts: 3905


Cool story, bro!


WWW
« Reply #40 on: June 11, 2008, 03:18:18 PM »

  At the start of the story Christopher seems like the stereotypical philandering jerk, but as the story progresses I think that we see that's he's not the total bastard he at first appears to be, while Jessica is not the totally innocent little victim in all this. At the start it looks like Jessica has been betrayed by a louse, but by the end we see that she is every bit as bad as Christopher may be, just in her own way.

There, now my initial impression of the story has been completely turned on its head, and it's a lot deeper than it first appeared.  I love this story!  Smiley
Logged

"Nerdcore is like playing Halo while getting a blow-job from Hello Kitty."
-- some guy interviewed in Nerdcore Rising
stePH
Actually has enough cowbell.
Hipparch
******
Posts: 3905


Cool story, bro!


WWW
« Reply #41 on: June 11, 2008, 10:21:17 PM »

Okay, I've just gone through the text at Strange Horizons, and here's the list of things that Christopher sent Jessica over the course of the story.  Apparently I did miscount -- I must have included Jessica's letters that didn't mention receiving any shipments -- because the list comes to exactly fourteen discrete shipments.

In order, Christpher sent:

1: "tear"-stained letter.
2: dozen roses & magnum of Mo√ęt.
3: one ski.
4: invitation to gallery showing.
5: Kuro 19 sculpture.
6: blow-up doll.
7: Harold Angel's Bar.
8: Motrin.
9: Saturday.
10: his penis & testicles.
11: Spain.
12: Olde English horseman.
13: Bosch's The Garden of Earthly Delights.
14: himself.

So there we have it.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2008, 08:33:47 AM by stePH » Logged

"Nerdcore is like playing Halo while getting a blow-job from Hello Kitty."
-- some guy interviewed in Nerdcore Rising
Chivalrybean
Peltast
***
Posts: 158



WWW
« Reply #42 on: June 12, 2008, 06:24:14 AM »


12: Olde English horseman.

She started talking in a Scottish accent if I recall... or maybe I'm reading into the story something that isn't there...
Logged

The Space Turtle - News that didn't happen, stories to entertain.
stePH
Actually has enough cowbell.
Hipparch
******
Posts: 3905


Cool story, bro!


WWW
« Reply #43 on: June 12, 2008, 08:32:40 AM »


12: Olde English horseman.

She started talking in a Scottish accent if I recall... or maybe I'm reading into the story something that isn't there...

I was going by the text that I saw; somebody else here mentioned he/she/it thought the horseman was the Pardoner from The Canterbury Tales, and the text resembled Chaucer's original in my copy.  I've never heard Old English spoken before, so it may well sound Scottish.
Logged

"Nerdcore is like playing Halo while getting a blow-job from Hello Kitty."
-- some guy interviewed in Nerdcore Rising
Ragtime
Palmer
**
Posts: 45


WWW
« Reply #44 on: June 12, 2008, 09:07:52 AM »


12: Olde English horseman.

She started talking in a Scottish accent if I recall... or maybe I'm reading into the story something that isn't there...

I was going by the text that I saw; somebody else here mentioned he/she/it thought the horseman was the Pardoner from The Canterbury Tales, and the text resembled Chaucer's original in my copy.  I've never heard Old English spoken before, so it may well sound Scottish.

"Pardoner" makes complete sense for the story.  The accent used by the reader, however, was very clearly Scottish, and appropriate for reading Robert Burns, rather than Chaucer.  I think it's just a case of a really dynamic reader making a choice that ended up confusing the listeners, who assumed the horseman was Scottish based on the reader's accent, rather than the text.
Logged
Heradel
Bill Peters, EP Assistant
Hipparch
******
Posts: 2938


Part-Time Psychopomp.


« Reply #45 on: June 12, 2008, 09:33:27 AM »


12: Olde English horseman.

She started talking in a Scottish accent if I recall... or maybe I'm reading into the story something that isn't there...

I was going by the text that I saw; somebody else here mentioned he/she/it thought the horseman was the Pardoner from The Canterbury Tales, and the text resembled Chaucer's original in my copy.  I've never heard Old English spoken before, so it may well sound Scottish.

"Pardoner" makes complete sense for the story.  The accent used by the reader, however, was very clearly Scottish, and appropriate for reading Robert Burns, rather than Chaucer.  I think it's just a case of a really dynamic reader making a choice that ended up confusing the listeners, who assumed the horseman was Scottish based on the reader's accent, rather than the text.

Having spent some time recently listening to stuff in old English, Scottish is much more comprehensible for modern ears. If it had been read in old English I think a good half of this thread would have been "did anyone understand the section with the knight" "I think he said something about a helicopter dog" "No, I thought it was about a viking god" and so on.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2008, 09:35:06 AM by Heradel » Logged

I Twitter. I also occasionally blog on the Escape Pod blog, which if you're here you shouldn't have much trouble finding.
stePH
Actually has enough cowbell.
Hipparch
******
Posts: 3905


Cool story, bro!


WWW
« Reply #46 on: June 12, 2008, 09:43:19 AM »

"Pardoner" makes complete sense for the story.  The accent used by the reader, however, was very clearly Scottish, and appropriate for reading Robert Burns, rather than Chaucer.  I think it's just a case of a really dynamic reader making a choice that ended up confusing the listeners, who assumed the horseman was Scottish based on the reader's accent, rather than the text.

The reader took liberties elsewhere in the text, I noticed.  In the letter that Jessica wrote while drunk after coming back from the bar, the text is rife with typos.  I don't know how I would have read it differently though.
Logged

"Nerdcore is like playing Halo while getting a blow-job from Hello Kitty."
-- some guy interviewed in Nerdcore Rising
Darwinist
Hipparch
******
Posts: 701



« Reply #47 on: June 12, 2008, 12:35:24 PM »

Blech!  I really hated this one.  Initially, it reminded me of Sex in the City (double blech) and it just went downhill for me as I realized that they would end up together again even though the guy had sex with her sister and maybe others while they were dating or whatever.  The letters drove me nuts (I hate you, I hate you, but let me tell you all about his thing.....).   And towards the end when the sister says that he was having sex with her to get to our heroine and that our heroine drove him away with her lofty standards.  Geez.  Oh well, that's why they call it fantasy.   
Logged

For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring.    -  Carl Sagan
Ragtime
Palmer
**
Posts: 45


WWW
« Reply #48 on: June 12, 2008, 12:50:07 PM »

And towards the end when the sister says that he was having sex with her to get to our heroine and that our heroine drove him away with her lofty standards.  Geez.  Oh well, that's why they call it fantasy.   

Speaking of which, Heather says why he was having sex with her, but never quite gets to explaining why SHE was having sex with HIM.  It's sort of written like it was the guy's unitary decision that made it  happen.

I mean, I don't care how much MY sister and her boyfriend aren't getting along . . .
Logged
Chivalrybean
Peltast
***
Posts: 158



WWW
« Reply #49 on: June 12, 2008, 08:06:25 PM »

I think if the characters were likable, and the crudeness was way down, I would have liked this story a lot.

Copying EP on the tagline was amusing, but you really should have copied something useful, like the rating warnings Steve gives.

Logged

The Space Turtle - News that didn't happen, stories to entertain.
hautdesert
Editor
*****
Posts: 315


« Reply #50 on: June 12, 2008, 09:40:43 PM »



Having spent some time recently listening to stuff in old English, Scottish is much more comprehensible for modern ears. If it had been read in old English I think a good half of this thread would have been "did anyone understand the section with the knight" "I think he said something about a helicopter dog" "No, I thought it was about a viking god" and so on.

Chaucer wrote in Middle English, not Old English.  Middle English is a great deal more comprehensible, with a bit of effort--witness the very charming and readable "Geoffrey Chaucer Hath A Blog."  Which, sadly, Mr. Chaucer has not posted to recently.

As to the pronunciation of Chaucer's brand of Middle English (there are other dialects of it, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, which was written by someone whose name we don't know at about the time Chaucer lived, was written in a Northern dialect that actually does require translation for us today)--where was I?  Oh. The pronunciation of Chaucer's dialect of Middle English.  No recordings to tell us, but there are some educated guesses out there.  The wikipedia entry on Chaucer, as it happens, says:

Quote
This change in the pronunciation of English, still not fully understood, makes the reading of Chaucer difficult for the modern audience, though it is thought by some that the modern Scottish accent is closely related to the sound of Middle English.

edited to add links.  cause, what was I thinking, not putting in the links?  Tongue
« Last Edit: June 12, 2008, 09:52:55 PM by hautdesert » Logged
Hatton
Peltast
***
Posts: 88



WWW
« Reply #51 on: June 13, 2008, 09:49:44 AM »

... you really should have copied something useful, like the rating warnings Steve gives.

+1!

This story made me laugh out loud but I'm REALLY glad I had headphones on when I listened!

The reader did a great job of a wounded lover, especially the drunk section and the "still hating you."
Logged

Normal is just a setting on the washing machine.
yicheng
Matross
****
Posts: 221


« Reply #52 on: June 13, 2008, 11:36:13 AM »

I loved the characters *because* they were crude and idiotic.  Speaking for myself, of course, I think it reflects (in a grown up kinda way) how a lot of people really are in their every day mundane life.  Personally, the fact that Christopher is a philanderer and Jessica an unforgiving perfectionist is exactly why the story works for me.  Real life people and real life relationship aren't perfect.  Real people are often shallow, self-absorbed, and plain stupid.  I know I am all that and more on a daily basis. 

As for why they get back together:

1) Because deep down they truly do love each other.
2) Because they're codependency forces them to stay with the other in a cycle of hellish mutual-torture.

Take your pick. 
Logged
Yossarian's grandson
Palmer
**
Posts: 47


Wisdom is knowing when to jump


« Reply #53 on: June 13, 2008, 03:59:12 PM »

Ehm...what?


That about sums up my thoughts about this story.
Logged
Cerebrilith
Palmer
**
Posts: 62


« Reply #54 on: June 13, 2008, 07:57:58 PM »

I liked this story a lot.  The progression from the mundane to the trippy was a lot of fun.  I wouldn't advise anyone to get back together with someone who cheated on them with their sister, but past that this story was great :-)
Logged
Bunter
Extern
*
Posts: 8



« Reply #55 on: June 13, 2008, 08:11:26 PM »

This is my favorite PC story so far, and one of my favorite EP/PP/PC episodes ever.  The reading was the *best evah* in the Escape Artists universe!

What I especially enjoyed about the story is - as others have mentioned - how you gradually came to see  that the narrator still liked Chris even as she was writing that she didn't.  People are often complicated in ways like that, and I think that SF/F too often ignores this facet of human nature.
Logged
Chivalrybean
Peltast
***
Posts: 158



WWW
« Reply #56 on: June 13, 2008, 08:52:03 PM »

What I especially enjoyed about the story is - as others have mentioned - how you gradually came to see  that the narrator still liked Chris even as she was writing that she didn't.  People are often complicated in ways like that, and I think that SF/F too often ignores this facet of human nature.

I might have to disagree that fantasy ignores the problems and failings of humans, but SF can focus a lot on neat gadgets or situations more than character development. The recent Slant of Light story had characters with problems and I really enjoyed that story (eventually).

Narration: Yes, it was very good in this story. So that makes two points good, the reading, and the Scotsman on a horse (I don't care what you say! Don't take away the Scotsman from me! {;0p )

Logged

The Space Turtle - News that didn't happen, stories to entertain.
kathnich
Extern
*
Posts: 7



« Reply #57 on: June 14, 2008, 09:41:24 AM »

So ya, quite good and fun.  Though was I the only one who thought that in the end the postman was going to deliver him, then take her away to his place?  Actually, I think them missing each other like that would have been a better ending.

No, you weren't the only one.  I was chortling in anticipation, then had to catch up, wondering why the postmen brought them both inside...

I thought that Heather's reasoning was about as warped as the Bosch painting.  But it was also clear to me that the heroine (interesting that it's her name I've blocked on..) really did still care about Christopher.  You don't spend that much energy telling somebody you hate them if there's not some interest.
Logged
petronivs
Extern
*
Posts: 15


« Reply #58 on: June 14, 2008, 11:46:44 AM »

The most profound, deep, gaping hole in this story was the horrible absence of a water buffalo.

Apart from that, it was a fun listen.
Logged
Darwinist
Hipparch
******
Posts: 701



« Reply #59 on: June 14, 2008, 02:50:15 PM »

Ehm...what?


That about sums up my thoughts about this story.

Hopefully they'll both get lost in the mail and disappear.
Logged

For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring.    -  Carl Sagan
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!