Author Topic: PC139: To Follow the Waves  (Read 30712 times)

deflective

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Re: PC139: To Follow the Waves
« Reply #100 on: July 13, 2011, 09:27:11 PM »
I'm not a fan so much of steampunk because of its tropes, colonial-centricism, and restraint of female characters (they can kick butt, but only in a bustle, only if a male saves them later, and only if they get married later).

our steampunk experiences have been very different.

eytanz

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Re: PC139: To Follow the Waves
« Reply #101 on: July 14, 2011, 11:39:01 AM »
I'm not a fan so much of steampunk because of its tropes, colonial-centricism, and restraint of female characters (they can kick butt, but only in a bustle, only if a male saves them later, and only if they get married later).

our steampunk experiences have been very different.

I agree; most steampunk I read errs on the side of ignoring the colonies, not being centered around them, and while I've read a lot of steampunk where female characters kick butt, I've read very little in which they then need to be rescued by men or get married afterwards.

DKT

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Re: PC139: To Follow the Waves
« Reply #102 on: July 14, 2011, 11:58:30 AM »
I'm not a fan so much of steampunk because of its tropes, colonial-centricism, and restraint of female characters (they can kick butt, but only in a bustle, only if a male saves them later, and only if they get married later).

our steampunk experiences have been very different.

In last week's SF Signal Mind Meld, Jeff VanderMeer (who edited a couple of Steampunk anthologies and the lovely looking Steampunk Bible) talked some about this, and about how big the steampunk sub-genre actually is. It's a good read, if anyone's interested.

Biscuit

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Re: PC139: To Follow the Waves
« Reply #103 on: July 17, 2011, 10:09:18 PM »
I'm not a fan so much of steampunk because of its tropes, colonial-centricism, and restraint of female characters (they can kick butt, but only in a bustle, only if a male saves them later, and only if they get married later).

our steampunk experiences have been very different.

I agree; most steampunk I read errs on the side of ignoring the colonies, not being centered around them, and while I've read a lot of steampunk where female characters kick butt, I've read very little in which they then need to be rescued by men or get married afterwards.


I'm thinking of Gail Carriger. Though people might argue it's not steampunk, but paranormal historical romance.

deflective

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Re: PC139: To Follow the Waves
« Reply #104 on: July 17, 2011, 10:19:21 PM »
i looked up the wikipedia article for Gail Carriger and found out her real name is Tofa Borregaard
why would you ever use a pen name if you had an awesome name like Tofa Borregaard?

danooli

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Re: PC139: To Follow the Waves
« Reply #105 on: July 18, 2011, 05:54:05 PM »
I have to admit that I LOVE Gail Carrigers "Parasol Protectorate" series  ;D

It's a light-hearted, interesting, jolly, non-challenging yet mildly intelligent and proper romp. Alexia Tarabotti is among my favorite heroines.  (I would love to have dinner with her and Marla Mason.  Provided I could fold time to allow that.)

I still have to read the latest, though...  ;D