Author Topic: Pseudopod 167: Love Like Thunder  (Read 26887 times)

El Sabor Asiático

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Reply #50 on: December 08, 2009, 10:21:21 PM
Great story. I wasn't really into it initially, but once the picture of what was happening became clear, I was hooked. I thought the author conveyed very effectively the weirdness of these non-human characters who are apparently of ancient (pre-human?) origins. I was reminded a little of Neil Gaiman, and how he writes so often about societies that exist parallel to but separate from human societies.

I don't (in general, not just Pseudopod) often see stories in the horror genre that are told from the perspective of a non-Western culture. Even when they're stories about some alien race or whatnot, the voice is so obviously grounded in Western themes, values, and patterns of thought that they may as well be set in Cleveland. This, to me, was a fine example of a voice that is not just from another culture but doesn't really even try to "translate" itself to a Western reader. That gave the story an eerie, otherworldly feel, even though the basic plot elements weren't unfamiliar.



Jim Bihyeh

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Reply #51 on: December 16, 2009, 03:38:14 PM
Great story. I wasn't really into it initially, but once the picture of what was happening became clear, I was hooked. I thought the author conveyed very effectively the weirdness of these non-human characters who are apparently of ancient (pre-human?) origins. I was reminded a little of Neil Gaiman, and how he writes so often about societies that exist parallel to but separate from human societies.

I don't (in general, not just Pseudopod) often see stories in the horror genre that are told from the perspective of a non-Western culture. Even when they're stories about some alien race or whatnot, the voice is so obviously grounded in Western themes, values, and patterns of thought that they may as well be set in Cleveland. This, to me, was a fine example of a voice that is not just from another culture but doesn't really even try to "translate" itself to a Western reader. That gave the story an eerie, otherworldly feel, even though the basic plot elements weren't unfamiliar.

I thank you for the compliments, sir, and I hope you understand the immeasureable blushing that goes on whenever this story and anything by Neil Gaiman is mentioned in the same sentence.

It's a very interesting point you bring up about the Western culture perspective. I believe that writers should follow that golden rule and write what they know - even Stephen King gets a little odd-bally when he ventures outside of New England (Dark Tower excepted, of course). That is what I tried to do with this story: to write about a place I know pretty well and to try to dig for something truly horrifying inside that soil. I'm glad you think I've gotten close to some of what might be there.

If you liked this story, my story, "Reservation Monsters" is also set in the world of Ganado, Arizona. Hopefully, it's worth as much of a listen.

*And you have a SWELL and SUAVE design style on your blog.*


The way you walked was thorny, through no fault of your own. But as the rain enters the soil, the river enters the sea...


TrapperDan

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Reply #52 on: February 02, 2010, 07:30:12 PM
I listen to pseudopod in bursts when i am at work.  The other night i had about 8 hours of down time where it was just me working away, so i happened to listen to Reservation Monsters and Love Like Thunder in the same night.

I want more of this world.  I want more amazing Native American legends, and well crafted characters.  Very well done, and a glimpse at this culture really shows how old it is.  Keep up the good work.



Jim Bihyeh

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Reply #53 on: February 17, 2010, 04:46:36 PM
I'm glad you were able to enjoy both stories in the same sitting! You're right: this really is an older world. And I think it's so interesting to see this older world attempting to keep pace with the modern one. Those characters are driven on at that same pace.

And fear not: there is a currently a Coyote Tales podcast in the works.


The way you walked was thorny, through no fault of your own. But as the rain enters the soil, the river enters the sea...


Millenium_King

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Reply #54 on: June 02, 2010, 11:37:21 PM
Just like to say that I just listened to this one - fantastic.  I thought the magic was well done and the story moved along excellently.  The double-threat of coyote and the "zombie" was a nice touch.

My only gripe is that I was not terribly impressed by the action sequences - they seemed a little lacking.  Apologies for not being able to be more specific, I suppose I would need to see it in prose for that.

Furthermore, I had listened to "The Dreaming Way" prior to this one and found this one a much, much better ride.

Jim (if you ever chance by again): did anything in print ever materialize?  My wife would love this, but I doubt she has the time to listen to it.  If you ever produce an anthology, I'd like to get it for her as a gift.

(edit)

Jim - I also wanted to ask if you have written any of these stories set in the past?  Either during colonial or pre-colonial times?
« Last Edit: June 02, 2010, 11:40:56 PM by Millenium_King »

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Jim Bihyeh

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Reply #55 on: June 09, 2010, 01:09:54 PM
Just like to say that I just listened to this one - fantastic.  I thought the magic was well done and the story moved along excellently.  The double-threat of coyote and the "zombie" was a nice touch.

My only gripe is that I was not terribly impressed by the action sequences - they seemed a little lacking.  Apologies for not being able to be more specific, I suppose I would need to see it in prose for that.

Furthermore, I had listened to "The Dreaming Way" prior to this one and found this one a much, much better ride.

Jim (if you ever chance by again): did anything in print ever materialize?  My wife would love this, but I doubt she has the time to listen to it.  If you ever produce an anthology, I'd like to get it for her as a gift.

(edit)

Jim - I also wanted to ask if you have written any of these stories set in the past?  Either during colonial or pre-colonial times?

To answer your question about the print market, I haven't submitted them yet. I'm finishing two more tales, and then they'll be ready to podcast and print. I just finished one titled "Dusk's Roots Run Deep" last night, and I can't wait to write the next one. (Things have been slow on the Tales. I've been finalizing work on a book titled "Navajos Wear Nikes" that will be coming out in spring 2011 * it's a memoir about modern life on the Rez* and I also just finished a YA novel titled "The Hero Twins: Weapons of the Storm." I'm shopping that one around to agents right now...)

And I do have a plan to write one of them in pre-colonial times. I wanted to set it during the Long Walk. But I might have to wait for another collection. I have a story of pre-Colonial times in the memoir (an old witch story my stepdad told me about his grandfather facing a skinwalker while coming back from a ceremony near Hard Rock, Arizona).

But if you're interested in pre-Colonial fiction, I cannot recommend James Welch's "Fools Crow" - a novel set in the 1870s on the Blackfoot homelands of western Montana. It is a masterpiece. It's one of my favorite books of all time. Read and be amazed at its authenticity.

Thanks for posting and I'll look forward to any other questions you have about The Coyote Tales!

All the best,
Jim Bihyeh

The way you walked was thorny, through no fault of your own. But as the rain enters the soil, the river enters the sea...


Millenium_King

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Reply #56 on: June 10, 2010, 06:43:12 AM
Hello Jim -

I will definately go get "Fool's Crow" right away.  I have a desire to set something around Native American lands (ever read "The Mound" by Zaelia Bishop? - yeah right, it was actually ghost written by H.P. Lovecraft).

I am kind of chilled that you mentioned skin-walkers:  My friend called me the other day (he's a long-haul truck driver) and he swears up and down the street that a skin-walker ran alongside his cab and kept pace with him whilst he was driving along a lonely highway in Utah one night.

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Jim Bihyeh

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Reply #57 on: June 10, 2010, 01:55:07 PM
Hello Jim -

I will definately go get "Fool's Crow" right away.  I have a desire to set something around Native American lands (ever read "The Mound" by Zaelia Bishop? - yeah right, it was actually ghost written by H.P. Lovecraft).

I am kind of chilled that you mentioned skin-walkers:  My friend called me the other day (he's a long-haul truck driver) and he swears up and down the street that a skin-walker ran alongside his cab and kept pace with him whilst he was driving along a lonely highway in Utah one night.

Great to hear you're going to pick up "Fools Crow"! Anything by Welch is great, but "Fools Crow" is his best.

Your friend's story about the skinwalker gives me some chills, too. That's a common skinwalker motif (running alongside the truck). They can do that. Though, it's weird to hear about skinwalkers up in Utah.

What highway in Utah? I lived my last three years of high school in Kane County in Southern Utah, in a community about 45 miles south of Kanab. Maybe I've driven the road...

The way you walked was thorny, through no fault of your own. But as the rain enters the soil, the river enters the sea...


Millenium_King

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Reply #58 on: June 11, 2010, 08:58:27 PM
Sorry, took me a while to answer.  My friend said it was on a highway near the famous "Skinwalker Ranch."  He wasn't actually on it though, he was closer to the nearby Ute reservation.

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Unblinking

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Reply #59 on: June 15, 2010, 01:41:38 PM
But if you're interested in pre-Colonial fiction, I cannot recommend James Welch's "Fools Crow" - a novel set in the 1870s on the Blackfoot homelands of western Montana. It is a masterpiece. It's one of my favorite books of all time. Read and be amazed at its authenticity.

I think you might mean "I cannot recommend James Welch's "Folls Crow" ENOUGH.  Otherwise that paragraph is a little contradctory with itself.  :)



Jim Bihyeh

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Reply #60 on: June 15, 2010, 06:52:21 PM
But if you're interested in pre-Colonial fiction, I cannot recommend James Welch's "Fools Crow" - a novel set in the 1870s on the Blackfoot homelands of western Montana. It is a masterpiece. It's one of my favorite books of all time. Read and be amazed at its authenticity.

I think you might mean "I cannot recommend James Welch's "Folls Crow" ENOUGH.  Otherwise that paragraph is a little contradctory with itself.  :)

Ah, nice catch on my rushed diction! Great save!  :) ENOUGH!

The way you walked was thorny, through no fault of your own. But as the rain enters the soil, the river enters the sea...


Jim Bihyeh

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Reply #61 on: October 16, 2012, 01:18:04 AM
Hello All,

Here's a little Halloween "treat" for you folks who have enjoyed "Coyote Tales" in the past.

I'm glad to say that “Coyote Tales” is FINALLY available in its entirety from Blackston Audio. In a downloadable format. And narrated by the awesome Cayenne Chris Conroy. You can find it on Amazon.com, Audible.com, Downpour.com, Audiobooks.com, and Waterstones.com.

I hope all is well as the season turns into autumn. And I hope your Halloween is night of superstition and fraught with terror. I’ll look forward to hearing from you here if you have any questions.

Take care,
Jim Kristofic
 
P.S. – I have included a list and brief summaries of the tales below, if you are interested to check it out and review it.

Reservation Monsters
-   A young boy with a monster living under his bed learns from Coyote that most monsters are far worse than the ones that go bump in the night.

The Dreaming Way
-   After Coyote reveals her hidden powers, a teenage girl must decide whether she will use them to save or destroy her community.

Love Like Thunder
-   A tragic schoolyard shooting invites a strange creature who sets up camp next to the local cemetery, where he goes to visit the dead so that he may live a few days longer.

The Speed of Lightning
-   In this novella, Shaun Sallabye, a famous high school runner, gets a shot of talent from Coyote that will push him to his limits, if it doesn’t break him first.

The Shooting Way
-   Jesse Benally is coming home to the Reservation. He doesn’t believe in witchcraft. But when his Aunt Bonita is afflicted with a strange sickness, he must meet with the local medicine man, who teaches Jesse that native witches don’t care what he believes in and what he doesn’t.

Black Body
-   Fernando Gishi waits for his father to get out of prison and rejoin his family. But after he finds the body of a dead girl in the desert, he must rely on his friends as a dark force reaches out to make a deal. And it’ll be a deal that he can’t refuse.

Changing Woman
-   Nellie Begay, a former combat nurse, is missing her daughter. When a supernatural force might know where she is, Nellie must find the strength to heal herself and talk to Changing Woman.

The Darkest Roots Run Deep
-   Ronnie Long, a maintenance worker barely making ends meet, will have to look to his girlfriend and their unborn child in order to forgive the biggest mistake of his life. Before it kills him.

Remember By Your Scars
-   Jane Lewis is a white nurse who fled the East coast and the scars of abusive relationships. And when her latest ends, a new man walks into her life and reopens all the scars she’s tried to hide.

The Bathroom People
-   LeCaine Keeyahani hates working fast-food but he hates the idea of leaving the Reservation even more. When his dying grandfather asks for LeCaine to help him end his life with dignity, only The Bathroom People hold the answer to LeCaine’s future.

The way you walked was thorny, through no fault of your own. But as the rain enters the soil, the river enters the sea...