Author Topic: Pseudopod 171: Napier’s Bones  (Read 11370 times)

Loz

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Re: Pseudopod 171: Napier’s Bones
« Reply #20 on: December 23, 2009, 01:06:22 PM »
I rarely say this about stories but it might have worked better if it were longer, while the start of the story, setting the scene, was pretty good the rest seemed rather too rushed, with an abrupt ending. I felt that if I stayed a little longer with Tom I might have actually cared more about his predicament, as it was the whole 'lone maverick going far beyond what his family/friends/work colleagues think is safe in search of arcane knowledge and paying the price' is a trope that is a little overused at the moment.

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Re: Pseudopod 171: Napier’s Bones
« Reply #21 on: December 23, 2009, 01:47:13 PM »
I rarely say this about stories but it might have worked better if it were longer, while the start of the story, setting the scene, was pretty good the rest seemed rather too rushed, with an abrupt ending.

I suspect that may have been entirely intentional on the part of the author (for good or bad).  The basis of the magic is exponential growth, so it may have been intended to have a story paced the same way.

Loz

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Re: Pseudopod 171: Napier’s Bones
« Reply #22 on: December 23, 2009, 07:06:28 PM »
Good point, I hadn't thought of that. If true it didn't work for me sadly.

eytanz

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Re: Pseudopod 171: Napier’s Bones
« Reply #23 on: December 28, 2009, 10:15:02 AM »
My main problem with this story is that the characters are caricatures. I found it very difficult to care what happens to them. Beyond that, it's a cautionary tale, but it seems a bit unsure of its own message - is it "don't aspire to be more than you are?" or "don't take shortcuts?" - those are very different messages but the story doesn't seem to distinguish between the two.

« Last Edit: December 28, 2009, 10:16:40 AM by eytanz »

empathy44

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Re: Pseudopod 171: Napier’s Bones
« Reply #24 on: February 21, 2010, 12:51:51 AM »
I liked this story.  An example of a non-Lovecraftian Lovecraft story. Forbidden texts--containing knowledge--leading to ruin.  I liked how this very particular version of this idea was illustrated. It felt like I got to look over someones shoulder into the forbidden tome rather than having it described to me as simply forbidden. Having it riff on real history and mathematics was a textural plus.

I thought it moved briskly and flowed smoothly. The conversations seemed plausible and the various people seemed to be very distinct personalities. For instance, he meetings with the professor were done in a way that you could follow the both the subject and the undercurrent. Moreover, I didn't find the characters to be caricatures--possibly because I find the whole freezing up under hostile pressure all too familiar. Able to be smart and funny one minute, forgetting the punchline the next.

The author deftly showed the set of carrots and sticks leading the protagonist to his ruin. Fear of being like his family, of losing his girl, looking like a fool were the sticks; the benefits he experienced with the improvements were the carrots.

I did care about the characters--well enough in fact that I found myself hoping that the main character's recovery of Helen's name when the bones were maneuvered out from under him was a sign that he was going to get better...due to the interruption...or something...reaching for a bone so to speak...

Napier seems to have been an instinctual mentalist.

 

Millenium_King

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Re: Pseudopod 171: Napier’s Bones
« Reply #25 on: May 31, 2010, 04:51:03 PM »
I know this is an older story, and I'm sorry to "resurrect" this thread - but I just listened to it for the first time yesterday and I wanted to say (in  case the author reads these) that it was motherf**king brilliant.  I loved it.

Also, Ian did a spectacular job reading it (as usual).
Visit my blog atop the black ziggurat of Ankor Sabat, including my list of Top 10 Pseudopod episodes.

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Re: Pseudopod 171: Napier’s Bones
« Reply #26 on: June 01, 2010, 03:22:34 PM »
I know this is an older story, and I'm sorry to "resurrect" this thread - but I just listened to it for the first time yesterday and I wanted to say (in  case the author reads these) that it was motherf**king brilliant.  I loved it.

Also, Ian did a spectacular job reading it (as usual).

Threadomancy is totally fine in story threads.  Trust me, if it were a crime, I would've been kicked out months ago.   ;D

Scattercat

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Re: Pseudopod 171: Napier’s Bones
« Reply #27 on: June 01, 2010, 07:30:56 PM »
I know this is an older story, and I'm sorry to "resurrect" this thread - but I just listened to it for the first time yesterday and I wanted to say (in  case the author reads these) that it was motherf**king brilliant.  I loved it.

Also, Ian did a spectacular job reading it (as usual).

Threadomancy is totally fine in story threads.  Trust me, if it were a crime, I would've been kicked out months ago.   ;D

And executed as a war criminal, 'cause if threadomancy is a crime, then you've committed some kind of genocide.
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