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Author Topic: PC107, Giant Episode: The Behold of the Eye  (Read 15189 times)
Zuishness
Palmer
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Posts: 21


« Reply #40 on: November 03, 2010, 05:45:44 PM »

I loved this story.

I'm raising a 9 year old son, who is somewhere on (or over) the Autistic Spectrum, and the whole thing struck one heck of a chord with me.

Every day is a battle for his heart and soul; fighting against the forces that might take his spirit and drop kick it firmly over to the dark side. This episode reinforced my determination not to allow his trusting and loving nature to be overcome by bitterness, disappointment and self-loathing.

Thank you so much for sharing this.
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yicheng
Matross
****
Posts: 221


« Reply #41 on: November 08, 2010, 10:46:08 AM »

I'm afraid I will have to be one of the dissenters here, and say that I didn't really like the story.  The imagery was vivid, lurid, and cinematic, but I didn't really feel like I got to understand the thought process or motivation of any of the characters.  The fairies just seemed "there" to experience things, and Toby (other than being a tormented gay artsy person) didn't really seem to be that fleshed out either.  While I found the changes in the internal landscape to be interesting, after about half-way through they had the feel of being over-the-top melodramatic.

Fuzzy was an interesting and original character, but I'm afraid I may have missed some point here as well, as I'm not sure what all the fuss was about.  Okay, so he's a manifestation of the Toby's hatred, self-loathing, and destructiveness.  What else?  I kept on waiting for something more.

On up-side MarBelle's reading was flawless as usual.  I've loved his style ever since he did Cinderella Suicide on EscapePod.  He has a fluidity with his dictation that makes all those quaint Victorian phrases come alive like he just stepped out of the Time Machine.
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Talia
Moderator
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Posts: 2680


Muahahahaha


« Reply #42 on: November 08, 2010, 11:03:35 AM »

Of course they're over the top melodramatic, I'd argue. It's a story about a person facing severe internal struggles - trauma, even. IMHO, extreme melodrama is quite fitting.
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Unblinking
Sir Postsalot
Hipparch
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Posts: 8660



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« Reply #43 on: November 08, 2010, 01:36:36 PM »

Of course they're over the top melodramatic, I'd argue. It's a story about a person facing severe internal struggles - trauma, even. IMHO, extreme melodrama is quite fitting.

I agree.  Though I tend to be pretty reserved on the outside, I don't think the inside of my head is.  Definiitely melodramatic in there, and part social interaction for me is keeping that somewhat on the inside "Don't let the crazy out!"   Smiley
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FireTurtle
Hipparch
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Posts: 898



« Reply #44 on: November 08, 2010, 03:25:35 PM »

Of course they're over the top melodramatic, I'd argue. It's a story about a person facing severe internal struggles - trauma, even. IMHO, extreme melodrama is quite fitting.

I agree.  Though I tend to be pretty reserved on the outside, I don't think the inside of my head is.  Definiitely melodramatic in there, and part social interaction for me is keeping that somewhat on the inside "Don't let the crazy out!"   Smiley

LOL! I always know when the crazy leaks out by the looks of total bewilderment around me. Keeping in the crazy is a very integral part of my life!
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“My imagination makes me human and makes me a fool; it gives me all the world and exiles me from it.”
Ursula K. LeGuin
yicheng
Matross
****
Posts: 221


« Reply #45 on: November 09, 2010, 10:22:40 AM »

To clarify, I never said the over-the-top melodrama wasn't without reason.  It just detracted from the story for me.  I think the main reason, again, is that we're given then extremely intimate and, at the same time, really opaque view of the characters.  We see all these very lurid and vivid dreamscape images inside Toby's head, but we have no idea what they mean, what he's really thinking, how he's acting, or what person psychological struggles set off these heavy-metal video montages.  It's just one montage after another, with very little explanation, that ultimately leaves your senses deafened and you just end up not really caring about the character.  I would also level the same complaint at Flashjack's character, as in the end all we know very little about him, his kind, his hopes, or his motivations.  I suppose the author was hoping that the reader would fill parts of himself into Toby's or Flashjack's role and extrapolate, but it just really didn't work for me.
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #46 on: November 09, 2010, 10:46:13 AM »

To clarify, I never said the over-the-top melodrama wasn't without reason.  It just detracted from the story for me.  I think the main reason, again, is that we're given then extremely intimate and, at the same time, really opaque view of the characters.  We see all these very lurid and vivid dreamscape images inside Toby's head, but we have no idea what they mean, what he's really thinking, how he's acting, or what person psychological struggles set off these heavy-metal video montages.  It's just one montage after another, with very little explanation, that ultimately leaves your senses deafened and you just end up not really caring about the character.  I would also level the same complaint at Flashjack's character, as in the end all we know very little about him, his kind, his hopes, or his motivations.  I suppose the author was hoping that the reader would fill parts of himself into Toby's or Flashjack's role and extrapolate, but it just really didn't work for me.

I see your points.  In particular, the characterization of Flashjack was pretty light, and I wish it hadn't been.  I'm sort of left with the impression that fairies in this universe aren't necessarily very individual.  They're an embodiment of a creative spark, but more just a force of nature than real people.  I never really cared what happened to Flashjack, and I think the reason for that is that he seemed pretty generic.  I'm not sure if my disinterest in Flashjack himself was intentional, to allow the story to focus on the boy(which makes sense), or if it was accidental.

I also see your point about us seeing the internal video montages without seeing the external world that created them.  With context, we could've easily made more sense of them.  But to me that was a strength, not a weakness.  As implied by the choice of the title, the core of the idea is the Behold of the Eye, where Flashjack lives.  He's focused mostly on this internal home, and so that's what we see in this story told in his POV.  If we'd seen everything going on outside at the same time as what was going inside, then the story would've been less interesting to me, the internals would've created a great deal of redundancy in the information provided (and been even longer).  By only providing one side, and by only providing the side that is abstract, we can understand his emotional reactions and from them try to understand the context that created those actions--that was the most interesting part of it for me.

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Scattercat
Caution:
Hipparch
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Posts: 4847


Amateur wordsmith


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« Reply #47 on: November 09, 2010, 05:08:43 PM »

Plus, by focusing on the emotional turmoil itself without being specific about the events in 'real life' that created it, that enables the reader to project more of themselves into the story.  One can empathize with the emotional upset qua emotional upset and substitute whatever has made you feel that way in the past with the sorts of reactions you see made concrete and symbolic in the Behold.  For a story intended to be basically an allegorical physical representation of an emotional journey, that strikes me as the correct route to take.
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---
Mirrorshards: Very Short Stories
100 Words.  No more.  No fewer.  Every day.
Splinters of Silver and Glass - The Mirrorshards Book
Fenrix
Curmudgeonly Co-Editor of PseudoPod
Editor
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Posts: 3723


I always lock the door when I creep by daylight.


« Reply #48 on: March 04, 2011, 03:55:13 PM »

Congrats to Fuzzy (and Hal Duncan) for winning eternal adoration with the Best of PodCastle 2010 poll.
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All cat stories start with this statement: “My mother, who was the first cat, told me this...”
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