Escape Artists
April 24, 2014, 06:52:27 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3  All
  Print  
Author Topic: EP245: The Moment  (Read 8780 times)
Swamp
Hipparch
******
Posts: 2216



WWW
« on: June 17, 2010, 01:04:28 AM »

EP245: The Moment

By Lawrence M. Schoen.
Read by Graeme Dunlop

Originally published in: Footprints

Guest Host: Norm Sherman of Drabblecast

One of the first generation of Krenn had lived long enough to reach the site, though none had expected to. The very first Krenn had conceived of this journey in the distant past, dedicating his life and his posterity to the pilgrimage with an ever recycling population of clones. Like their clone-father, each was an optimized collection of smart matter no bigger than a speck. Hundreds of generations of Krenn had lived and died during the voyage, their remains enshrined into niches in the very walls of the vessel that now lay shattered at its destination.

The survivors flooded out upon the steppes of the heel, rejoicing despite the crushing weight that gravity forced upon them. They settled in, constructing mansions of haze and shadow, and waited for enlightenment to come. The mission and purpose of the first Krenn remained with each of them. This place had been the site of the greatest triumph of the greatest archaeocaster in all of history. Before the beginning of the quest, Krenn—the original Krenn—had felt drawn to it. He had cultivated the tales, sifted myth from coincidence, mastered the lost language of the interview-eschewing, spatial curmudgeons of the ancient dark times, and recreated the route through dimensional puzzles to this theoretical location. The odds of success had been so absurd not a single entelechy of Krenn’s crèche dared invest time or expense in the project. And yet, here they were, nearly three hundred unique individuals sharing the template of Krenn.


Rated PG. for Space Exploration and Looking into the Abyss.


Listen to this week’s Escape Pod!
Logged

Facehuggers don't have heads!

Come with me and Journey Into... another fun podcast
eytanz
Moderator
*****
Posts: 4450



« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2010, 11:48:52 AM »

I loved this story for 90% of it, but I hated the ending. A series of cool futures, with cool aliens and events that build off each other in brilliant ways - and it all ends up with a (literal) lesson that "humans did something that was in no way unique, but when they did it it was *special*". Ugh. Just ugh.

On the plus side, nothing stops me from admiring the beginning of the story and pretending that the ending never happened. So I'm going to do that, in blissfull self-delusion. But if this story wins the Hugo, as opposed to the imaginary one in my head that ended 5 minutes earlier, I'm going to be mighty annoyed.

Kibitzer's reading was great, btw.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2010, 11:54:51 AM by eytanz » Logged
bumdhar
Extern
*
Posts: 12


« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2010, 12:02:52 PM »

Half way through this story I thought, “this is how religions are formed.” Thus I wasn’t surprised when the story ended with protogods. I found the descriptions of alien life and thought interesting. It made me reflect how our language can only vaguely describe other modes (alien) of consciousness and experience. It reminded me of, in a way, of mystics who attempt to describe other states of consciousness.

Welcome back to Escape Pod Norm!
Logged
KenK
Guest
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2010, 05:36:21 PM »

The author tried for a higher level of profundity than his/her talent was capable of delivering. It was kinda predictable how this would end,  too,(or maybe I just guessed right  Grin )

As with last week I am again surprised that this is a Hugo nominee. It seems like they could find better stuff. My standards are distorted by the fact that I knew in advance that it was potential Hugo. If I hadn't known that fact then my reaction would probably be more generous.
Logged
CryptoMe
Hipparch
******
Posts: 765



« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2010, 09:11:09 PM »

I'm in general agreement with what has already been said.

There was a lot of really cool imagery in this story; microbes colonizing the famous Apollo 11 footprint (I'm assuming that was the one), cannibalistic sentient broccoli, a choral review of a scientific journal paper, etc. 

But,  unfortunately, the end didn't live up to all that.

Also, it was a bit too dense for audio. But, that is forgivable, since it was chosen because it's a Hugo nominee.
Logged
Kaa
Lochage
*****
Posts: 541


Trusst in me, jusst in me.


WWW
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2010, 12:24:23 AM »

Well, I don't care what everyone else said. I enjoyed the WHOLE story, not just the first part.
Logged

I invent imaginary people and make them have conversations in my head. I also write.

About writing || About Atheism and Skepticism (mostly) || About Everything Else
Ocicat
Castle Watchcat
Moderator
*****
Posts: 2145


Anything for a Weird Life


« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2010, 03:00:39 AM »

Lots of great bits, but the ultimately failed to come together well.  Was still an entertaining listen though.

Grant Morrison would love this story.
Logged
KenK
Guest
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2010, 07:15:21 AM »

@ Ocicat
Who is Grant Morrison? Why would he/she love it?  Huh
Logged
DKT
Friendly Neighborhood
Editor
*****
Posts: 4201


PodCastle is my Co-Pilot


WWW
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2010, 07:21:52 AM »

Grant Morrison.

One of the coolest writers of weird comic books out there. And some mainstream ones, too.
Logged

KenK
Guest
« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2010, 08:28:14 AM »

Thanks.  Wink
Logged
Unblinking
Sir Postsalot
Hipparch
******
Posts: 5723



WWW
« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2010, 08:51:33 AM »

I thought kibitzer's reading was very good, I like his voice.  I liked it on that Podcastle story too, but hadn't known it was him yet.  Smiley  The one negative thing that I noticed is that I could hear mouth noises from time to time like swallowing--not sure if there's a filter or something for that, but something to keep in mind.

Anyway, the meandering story was neat.  I spaced out a couple times, but that didn't really seem to matter because each section was almost entirely encapsulate.  The imaginings of the separate sentient alien races and their different forms of communications were very cool and interesting worldbuilding.

But the ending was just terrible.  The story, I can understand as a Hugo nominee, but the ENTIRE story is structured to build up to the ending which was like a whoopee cushion when you're expecting TNT.  Terribly weak--I was really interested in why this footprint was so special, and was hoping there was a good and rational and compelling and interesting reason for it.
Logged

--David Steffen
The Submissions Grinder:  Fiction market listings, submissions tracker, always free, poetry and nonfiction markets coming soon!
KenK
Guest
« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2010, 09:47:19 AM »

But the ending was just terrible.  The story, I can understand as a Hugo nominee, but the ENTIRE story is structured to build up to the ending which was like a whoopee cushion when you're expecting TNT.  Terribly weak--I was really interested in why this footprint was so special, and was hoping there was a good and rational and compelling and interesting reason for it.

It seems more of an issue with the Hugo selection committee than with EP, but yeah I agree with that.
Logged
Unblinking
Sir Postsalot
Hipparch
******
Posts: 5723



WWW
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2010, 09:52:16 AM »

It seems more of an issue with the Hugo selection committee than with EP, but yeah I agree with that.

Aren't the Hugos voted on by attendants of WorldCon or something?  So it's not so much a committee, as just the nebulous ever-changing group of convention attendants?  Or does the committee select the five finalists and then the attendants vote between those?
Logged

--David Steffen
The Submissions Grinder:  Fiction market listings, submissions tracker, always free, poetry and nonfiction markets coming soon!
Unblinking
Sir Postsalot
Hipparch
******
Posts: 5723



WWW
« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2010, 09:53:17 AM »

And yeah, I wasn't knocking EP for running it.  I like to see the Hugo nominees here, and it's not their fault if every nominee doesn't knock my socks off.
Logged

--David Steffen
The Submissions Grinder:  Fiction market listings, submissions tracker, always free, poetry and nonfiction markets coming soon!
KenK
Guest
« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2010, 12:08:22 PM »

I see what you mean. I looked up their nomination process and found that it seems to be a popularity contest more than anything else.  Roll Eyes And the winner selection, ditto. I guess am disappointed that it wasn't more refined, more literary and objective, not just who gets the most PR, buzz, and whatever.  Lips sealed
Hugo Award nomination process
Logged
lmorchard
Extern
*
Posts: 4



WWW
« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2010, 03:29:07 PM »

I would like to nominate Norm Sherman's intro to this episode for some kind of award, though. As usual, his intros are great, but pulling in The Wizard  and Super Mario Bros 3 (wait the F#$%, he can fly now? how'd he turn into a raccoon?!) really put this one over the top for me.
Logged

stePH
Actually has enough cowbell.
Hipparch
******
Posts: 3779

Cool story, bro!


« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2010, 06:19:43 PM »

Norm: "The Hugo nominees never disappoint."

I can't agree.  Leaving past years aside, this set is 0 for 2 so far.  I just didn't connect with this one at all, and I'd further submit last week's, which was so forgettable that all I can remember about it is that I was astonished at it being a Hugo nominee.
Logged

"Nerdcore is like playing Halo while getting a blow-job from Hello Kitty."
-- some guy interviewed in Nerdcore Rising
Boggled Coriander
Lochage
*****
Posts: 545



WWW
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2010, 06:43:17 PM »

I had a hard time following this one.  I liked individual bits, but my brain wouldn't arrange everything into a cohesive whole.

I think I would have enjoyed it more in written format.  Oftentimes, what I have a hard time following in audio I can understand pretty easily on the page.  (That's not kibitzer's fault.  He did a great job.  That's how my mind processes audio vs. text.)
Logged

"The meteor formed a crater, vampires crawling out of the crater." -  The Lyttle Lytton contest
kibitzer
Purveyor of Unsolicited Opinions
EA Staff
*****
Posts: 1892


Kibitzer: A meddler who offers unwanted advice


« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2010, 07:41:39 PM »

This one IS a bit of a tough listen because it's so conceptually dense -- it may be easier to read. I think it gets better if you re-read it (or re-listen or whatever).

Thanks for the kind comments on my reading. I'm trying to improve my recording rig so I'll watch out for stray noises and such.
Logged

Talia
Moderator
*****
Posts: 2489


I like pie


« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2010, 07:48:30 PM »

Definitely not a great fit for audio, but I thought the story was utterly fantastic, the epic scope of it, the imagination of all these different generations of wildly different life forms! Really brilliant! I definitely see why it earned a Hugo nom nom nom. The ending left me slightly confused, but I think I just need to think on it for a while. I was dazzled enough by the rest of the story to think very highly of it, regardless.

Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!