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Author Topic: PC122: Kingspeaker  (Read 11323 times)
Swamp
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« Reply #40 on: October 08, 2010, 07:04:46 PM »

I don't listen to any story podcasts other than the EA ones and Dunesteef.  When there is a primarily written form, I read the stories instead.

Not even the Drabblecast? Shocked  With as many drabbles as you have posted or that been read by Norm, I find that hard to believe.  Wink
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Scattercat
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« Reply #41 on: October 08, 2010, 09:09:49 PM »

I don't listen to any story podcasts other than the EA ones and Dunesteef.  When there is a primarily written form, I read the stories instead.

Not even the Drabblecast? Shocked  With as many drabbles as you have posted or that been read by Norm, I find that hard to believe.  Wink

Oh, right.  And the Drabblecast.

Point is, I don't listen to the podcasts at all the other magazines listed, so the complaint that "everyone" does so is spurious.  Frankly, I can tear through a half dozen written stories in the time it takes me to listen to just one, so podcasts are deeply counterproductive for me.
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Mirrorshards: Very Short Stories
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #42 on: October 11, 2010, 08:46:11 AM »

Oh, right.  And the Drabblecast.

Point is, I don't listen to the podcasts at all the other magazines listed, so the complaint that "everyone" does so is spurious.  Frankly, I can tear through a half dozen written stories in the time it takes me to listen to just one, so podcasts are deeply counterproductive for me.

I find the opposite is true for me.  It seems like if I'm just sitting down somewhere, I always have something else I need to do.  But I listen to podcasts when I'm doing low-cognitive tasks like household chores or interstate driving.
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kibitzer
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« Reply #43 on: October 11, 2010, 08:52:16 PM »

+1 Unblinking.

For me, it's getting to and from work on public transport; walking the dogs; car trips longer than, say, 15 mins. With the walking, I can and have and do read while I walk but the audio is easier. Also: a well-read story is just a complete delight. There is something very powerful about the spoken word and done well, such a story can send chills down your spine, make laugh out loud, or quietly cry.
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #44 on: October 12, 2010, 08:58:53 AM »

+1 Unblinking.

For me, it's getting to and from work on public transport; walking the dogs; car trips longer than, say, 15 mins. With the walking, I can and have and do read while I walk but the audio is easier. Also: a well-read story is just a complete delight. There is something very powerful about the spoken word and done well, such a story can send chills down your spine, make laugh out loud, or quietly cry.

On a sidenote, I also sometimes get strong associations in my brain between the story I am listening to and the action that I am doing at the time.  For instance, a particular stretch of road across South Dakota makes me think of The Button Bin.  The line at the post office sometimes makes me think of Hell is the Absence of God, or sometimes that story about the mostly venom-proof religious cult (I can't think of the name).

When I was a kid, we had a little 8 inch old black and white TV and then a bigger 25 inch color TV.  Sometimes in the summer I'd put them in the same room and play video games while I listened to re-runs of TV shows.  So, for instance, there is one particular level of The Illusion of Gaia with a jungle setting associated with an episode of Star Trek TNG where Riker falls in love with a member of an asexual alien race.  Whenever I think of one, I think of the other in tandem.
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Scattercat
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« Reply #45 on: October 12, 2010, 01:05:00 PM »

I have the same thing.  It's particularly strong in this one stretch of road about a hundred miles northwest of Charlotte (which is where I heard and was annoyed by "Now + N, Now - N" and with Splinterstone Valley in Loch Modan over in World of Warcraft, where the really annoying chain of Trogg quests was made easier by "The Dinner Game."
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« Reply #46 on: October 18, 2010, 10:54:56 AM »

On a sidenote, I also sometimes get strong associations in my brain between the story I am listening to and the action that I am doing at the time.  For instance, a particular stretch of road across South Dakota makes me think of The Button Bin.  The line at the post office sometimes makes me think of Hell is the Absence of God, or sometimes that story about the mostly venom-proof religious cult (I can't think of the name).

I have done a very unscientific study on this, and have found several people that this holds true for, including myself.  For instance, back when I was commuting to Boston, I read Zodiac one very hot summer, and I still associate that book with riding the silver line out to the pier where I worked.  For podcasts, I will always associate "Will You Be An Astronaut" through "On the Eyeball Floor" with a road trip to a wedding in PA I went to last year.  Even just the title of one of those stories pops up an image of where I was. 
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« Reply #47 on: October 18, 2010, 10:57:04 AM »

Back to the story itself.  I liked this one, but it won't stick around in my brain for long, I don't think, as it did not bring up much that was new or different.  I could see where it was going, but it was written well enough that I enjoyed the ride.
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Maplesugar
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« Reply #48 on: October 19, 2010, 12:39:08 AM »

I have the same thing.  It's particularly strong in this one stretch of road about a hundred miles northwest of Charlotte (which is where I heard and was annoyed by "Now + N, Now - N" and with Splinterstone Valley in Loch Modan over in World of Warcraft, where the really annoying chain of Trogg quests was made easier by "The Dinner Game."

Oh goodie- I am so glad that someone else listens to EA stories while WoWing. 
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stePH
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« Reply #49 on: October 20, 2010, 04:20:48 PM »

I don't listen to any story podcasts other than the EA ones and Dunesteef.  When there is a primarily written form, I read the stories instead.

I now listen only to the EA story podcasts, as both Variant Frequencies and Clonepod have gone off.
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Heradel
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« Reply #50 on: October 25, 2010, 07:39:59 PM »

The discussion as to the deliciousness of maple sugar may be found here: http://forum.escapeartists.net/index.php?topic=4492.0
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yicheng
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« Reply #51 on: November 03, 2010, 12:18:44 PM »

While I generally enjoyed the story, it felt very very toned down in terms of plot and character dimensionality.  The Kingspeaker "has no voice", "only speaks words belonging to the King", etc, etc.   We are continually reminded of this fact like a mantra, until it gets rather annoying.

I also thought the plot "twists" were rather obvious.  The Bandit King evading the King's army and seemed rather obvious tactic, akin to the classic boxing duck & weave.  Any general that didn't at least counsel the king to properly scout out the location of the enemy and to protect his supply line ought to have his head lopped off.  And how exactly does a massive army moving through your countryside, looting and pillaging, escape your detection?  Contrary to popular belief, it is *extremely* difficult to massacre everyone in a village/town (e.g. Darfur, Nanking, Stalingrad).  Even assuming you take everyone by surprise and none of the local guards manage to ride out for help or light a signal fire, there's always some little kid that manages to escape into the forest, some old woman hiding out in a cellar, or some guy that manages to play dead.  Always.  One of those people would have surely stumbled down the road to warn the city.

And assuming that for a moment the Band King's army was disciplined enough to make their way unnoticed to the *Capital* of the country, it doesn't make any sense that he wouldn't have kept some sort of vanguard to watch for any ambushes, which again is a rather obvious tactic.
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #52 on: November 04, 2010, 08:57:05 AM »

Contrary to popular belief, it is *extremely* difficult to massacre everyone in a village/town (e.g. Darfur, Nanking, Stalingrad).  Even assuming you take everyone by surprise and none of the local guards manage to ride out for help or light a signal fire, there's always some little kid that manages to escape into the forest, some old woman hiding out in a cellar, or some guy that manages to play dead.  Always.  One of those people would have surely stumbled down the road to warn the city.

That's a good point.  Being completely thorough would take a long time, long enough to starve out the lurkers.
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