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Author Topic: EP258: Raising Jenny  (Read 14050 times)
LaShawn
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Writer Mommies Rule!


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« Reply #120 on: November 12, 2010, 12:13:03 PM »

Very interesting. I listened to this yesterday after I had come from my son's parent-teacher conference. She spent most of the time telling how creative and bright he was, and yet how he couldn't focus, gets hung up on the smallest details. It was like she held a mirror right at me.

I found this story to be quite complicated. What we have here is a story of two women who fail to understand each other. Yes, Jenny the mother was overbearing and manipulative in a passive-aggressive way. Adrian falls prey to her sense of "duty" (remember, Jenny never said that Adrian is to raise the clone--she only stipulated it be one of her daughters.) At the same time, though, she hungers for her mother to understand her, so I don't fault her in raising the clone herself. I also happen to have an overbearing mother, to the point that strongly against her wishes, I left (I now live in a neighboring state whereas my sisters still live with my mother). In the two years I've seen her, she's only come up and see me twice, and only for an afternoon, really, than the many times we've gone down to see her. And yet, dang it all, I still do, because I can't help it. I want her to understand me. She's my mother.

I'm in agreement with Mur at the end, when I hungered to see a change in Adrian, that after her epiphany that she would re-examine her own life, make changes at last of going to college, going off to school. But it could very well be that Jennifer would see Adrian's change of herself after she gets married as complete rejection. And then it will be misunderstandings all the way forward.

I guess, to make a long story short, it's hard to raise a kid who has a completely different make-up than you. Even if, at the heart of things, the two are you are the same.

And no, I never saw It's a Wonderful life either. But I did read Cyteen. Awesome story.
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LaShawn
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« Reply #121 on: February 07, 2011, 12:30:31 PM »

Heh...today's Dilbert made me think of this story!

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Balu
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« Reply #122 on: February 08, 2011, 11:53:04 AM »

What a waste of time this story was.

It's only saving grace was that it reminded me of the Turkey City Lexicon, something which always makes me smile:

Abbess Phone Home

Takes its name from a mainstream story about a medieval cloister which was sold as SF because of the serendipitous arrival of a UFO at the end. By extension, any mainstream story with a gratuitous SF or fantasy element tacked on so it could be sold.

http://www.critters.org/turkeycity.html

I bet that the clone thing wasn't added to this until after it had been turned down by Woman's Own  Cheesy
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iamafish
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« Reply #123 on: February 08, 2011, 04:43:18 PM »

except that the cloning element was important to the story because Jennifer was an exact clone of Jenny. Had she just been the narrator's daughter it would have had far less impact.

the 'sci-fi bit' doesn't have to be ever-present for it to be important to the story or for it to be labeled sci-fi.

I'd love for you to explain why this story was a waste of time.
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Balu
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« Reply #124 on: February 08, 2011, 05:57:12 PM »

I'd love for you to explain why this story was a waste of time.

Because it took the place of the usual top quality SF I thought I was going to spend fifty minutes listening to.

Instead I was tricked into wasting almost an hour of my life being subjected to something that should have been sent to Good Housekeeping.

Don't get me wrong. I'm sure lots of people love this sort of dreary middleaged emo schtick. But that's no excuse for sticking a gimp mask of an SF motif on it and smuggling it into Escape Pod.
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Now more than ever we need the Jedi.
eytanz
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« Reply #125 on: February 08, 2011, 06:07:51 PM »

And it seems like it's time for a quick message from the moderator, reminding everyone of the one rule.

There's certainly nothing wrong with finding the story dreary or not to one's taste, but given that there were certainly people who liked this story on this forum, it's worth remembering that it meets some people's definitions of SF.
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iamafish
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« Reply #126 on: February 09, 2011, 02:30:28 AM »

I'd love for you to explain why this story was a waste of time.

Because it took the place of the usual top quality SF I thought I was going to spend fifty minutes listening to.

Instead I was tricked into wasting almost an hour of my life being subjected to something that should have been sent to Good Housekeeping.

Don't get me wrong. I'm sure lots of people love this sort of dreary middleaged emo schtick. But that's no excuse for sticking a gimp mask of an SF motif on it and smuggling it into Escape Pod.

space ships and aliens to not a sci-fi make.

It contained futuristic tech and frequent references to subtle differences between the setting of the story and the present. It might be understated, but there's no reason why this shouldn't be called sci fi. You're missing the point of genre distinctions.

sorry you didn't like it, that's your call. Not all stories are for everyone, but please try to be civil about voicing your dislike.
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Balu
Matross
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« Reply #127 on: February 09, 2011, 08:01:00 AM »

The problem is that space ships and aliens (and clones) do make SF. That's why they're sometimes tacked on to otherwise unmarketable stuff.

The question is, did this straight up and down 'I don't want to become my mother' story need an SF veneer?  

I don't think that it did. If anything that cloning angle detracted from it. As somebody else said, it was the gun on the mantlepiece that was never used.

BTW, apologies if my criticism of the story itself was a bit pugnacious. It was well written, it just wasn't very Escape Artisty.
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Now more than ever we need the Jedi.
eytanz
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« Reply #128 on: February 09, 2011, 08:05:39 AM »

For what it's worth, my own impression was that this wasn't a mundane story given an SF veneer (compared to that sitcom-on-a-space-station from a couple of years ago whose name I'm forgetting), I felt it was a story that started from an SF concept and tried to make it as mundane as possible. I thought it did it quite well, but I can see why that wouldn't work for everyone.

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Unblinking
Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #129 on: February 09, 2011, 09:55:38 AM »

What a waste of time this story was.

It's only saving grace was that it reminded me of the Turkey City Lexicon, something which always makes me smile:

Abbess Phone Home

Takes its name from a mainstream story about a medieval cloister which was sold as SF because of the serendipitous arrival of a UFO at the end. By extension, any mainstream story with a gratuitous SF or fantasy element tacked on so it could be sold.

http://www.critters.org/turkeycity.html

I bet that the clone thing wasn't added to this until after it had been turned down by Woman's Own  Cheesy

On the subject of genre boundaries, did anyone read "Because Someone Had to be Neil Gaiman" in Realms of Fantasy a couple years ago?  It had 0 fantasy element whatsoever, and its only tie-in with a fantasy magazine seemed to be that it mentioned Neil Gaiman.  That drove me nuts.  Anyway...
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Gamercow
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« Reply #130 on: February 09, 2011, 11:20:51 AM »

The question is, did this straight up and down 'I don't want to become my mother' story need an SF veneer?  

I don't think that it did. If anything that cloning angle detracted from it. As somebody else said, it was the gun on the mantlepiece that was never used.

I'm not sure if it needed the SF veneer, but I disagree it was never used.  There were hints and gestures towards the nature vs nurture debate, which was an underlying part of the story.
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iamafish
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« Reply #131 on: February 09, 2011, 07:42:42 PM »

The question is, did this straight up and down 'I don't want to become my mother' story need an SF veneer?

given that Jenifer turn out to be very much like Jenny, from whom she was cloned, I'd argue that this story wouldn't have made any sense without a scifi element.

Without that the story would simply be about the narrator. It's not; it's about Jenifer as well.


Sci-fi adds a new level of complexity to this story
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luka datas
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« Reply #132 on: December 16, 2012, 03:43:26 AM »

ten stars out of a possible five. great work well read.  Cry
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SonofSpermcube
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« Reply #133 on: March 30, 2013, 06:03:27 AM »

The question is, did this straight up and down 'I don't want to become my mother' story need an SF veneer?

given that Jenifer turn out to be very much like Jenny, from whom she was cloned, I'd argue that this story wouldn't have made any sense without a scifi element.

Without that the story would simply be about the narrator. It's not; it's about Jenifer as well.


Sci-fi adds a new level of complexity to this story

Plenty of people end up being like second-order relatives.  I remind pretty much everyone in my extended family of my uncle.  Though I've never seen one of his drawings, I'm told I draw in the same style.  We read many of the same authors, though we rarely consult one another on the subject.  And I'd only met him twice before adulthood. 

Sci-fi removes complexity from this story.
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