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Author Topic: PC166: Stereogram Of The Gray Fort, In The Days Of Her Glory  (Read 5882 times)
Thomas
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« Reply #20 on: July 26, 2011, 01:44:07 PM »

That's just all kinds of twisted.

Agreed. I had not seen it that way.

Martyrs do extraordinary things to bring about the extraordinary in others...
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Oren
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« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2011, 12:04:59 AM »

I've always been a fan of the "Elves Conquering Humans" motif, and I thought this was very well written. Seeing events again through Jessica's perspective really helped invest me in both sides of the story.

The double narrator dynamic worked out great, and I hope to see more of that in the future.

If I have one complaint, its that the Elves seemed too much like humans. I wanted them to be more alien, stranger.
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Tunos
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« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2011, 08:48:26 AM »

I absolutely loved this story - which was unexpected because I sort of hated it at first.  Of course the story doesn't really start until it's halfway finished.  The idea of using the stereogram in the story to mirror the stereogram of the narration was inspired.  Certainly there is some time spent rehashing things that have been fully dealt with in the first narration, but, as with the stereogram of the Gray Fort, it's only in the collective that the real picture is revealed.  This moved right into my Top 5 of PodCastle.
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NomadicScribe
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« Reply #23 on: July 27, 2011, 08:23:21 PM »

What I was actually referring to was Jessica's plan to assassinate an elf lord in order to trigger reprisals in the hopes that a vicious round of slayings and massacres would somehow spur a rebellion.  That's just all kinds of twisted.

It's twisted, and actually a very poor tactic for reclaiming dominance. But it is not an unreasonable one. Her character is not one with a lot of training or experience. Just one with ambition and opportunity. She has a solid chance at triggering a new all-out war which would wipe out her own species. But that's kind of what I liked about it. War begets war, and all that; at least if it's done poorly.
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Kanasta
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« Reply #24 on: July 29, 2011, 03:48:12 PM »

I was really hoping that Jessica was somehow using her proximity to Loren to infiltrate into the elfen government, so while I was glad that this was partly true, I was admittedly disappointed that she settled for killing him instead.

Me too! I thought it was part of a big plan, as we were told how relaxed the Elf rule seemed to be these days, etc.
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Salul
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« Reply #25 on: July 29, 2011, 10:43:26 PM »

I absolutely loved this story - which was unexpected because I sort of hated it at first. 

Ditto.
But I so liked it I ended up listening to it twice. It's been years since I last did that.
In this case, I was glad to give myself an opportunity to listen more attentively to each sentence,
and really enjoy the author's skill. A darn good tale through and through for many of the reasons outlined above.
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lisavilisa
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« Reply #26 on: July 30, 2011, 08:34:57 PM »


Actually, repression is really good at repressing people.  What makes freedom and revolutions is options and a lax leash.


source?
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iamafish
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« Reply #27 on: July 31, 2011, 05:27:27 AM »

think about it.

when have the majority of revolutions happened in history? Since the enlightenment. When there conditions worst for the lower classes? Probably the early Middle Ages.

Poor working conditions and oppression from the upper classes doesn't breed revolution, the the possibility of better does. People only think about throwing off the yoke of oppression when a better possibility presents itself.

How many revolutions were there in the USSR when Stalin was repressing the hell out of people? Almost none. It was only once Stalin was gone that things relapsed and the USSR disintegrated.
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lisavilisa
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« Reply #28 on: July 31, 2011, 11:29:53 AM »

How do you measure this? What qualifies as a revolution? Has anyone done a study on the correlation of rights gained/taken away vs. uprisings? I get the hypothesis, I just wonder if anyone has actually tried to test it. There would need to be parameters, qualifiers, and such. Seems like it'd be a good study.
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NomadicScribe
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« Reply #29 on: July 31, 2011, 04:30:50 PM »

Has anyone done a study on the correlation of rights gained/taken away vs. uprisings?

I'm sure analysis has been done on the subject. I don't have time now, but when I get a chance I'll look into it, because the subject seriously interests me.
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Sandra M. Odell
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« Reply #30 on: August 01, 2011, 06:15:02 PM »

Well written, and the dual narration really served the story well.  I will agree that hearing one character's voice during the other's narration was a bit disconcerting.

I'll be honest that I didn't see the twist when she first acquired the dagger, I was so caught up in Loren's PoV, but as soon as Jessica's started it was obvious and an enjoyable ride to see where the story would end.


Sandra
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olivaw
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« Reply #31 on: August 01, 2011, 08:33:07 PM »

I particularly liked the setting of this.
I love the idea of wandering around the ruins of Gondolin, or Camelot, and finding it stuffed with tacky tourist gimmicks and people hawking tat.
To take that prosaic let-down, and transform it into a new chapter in the great romantic struggle - well, that's what Fantasy is all about, isn't it?
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mbrennan
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« Reply #32 on: August 05, 2011, 03:05:06 PM »

I seem to be in the minority, in that I wasn't all that thrilled by this one.  The "stereogram" of the structure is an interesting idea, but it didn't work for me: unlike the picture, which was meaningless blobs on both sides, and only made sense when combined (which, granted, would be hard to pull off as narrative, and then I'd probably be complaining about avant-garde stunt writing instead), I guessed about 98% of the second half of the story just by listening to the first.  Jessica's narration only confirmed what I already knew, with a couple of minor additional touches.  And since it kept covering the same events, I really lost interest and was just waiting for her to stab him already.
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promethiandeath
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« Reply #33 on: August 06, 2011, 04:16:36 PM »

I joined the forums just to say how much I truly love this story, and how much I loved the dual narration on the PodCast...

I have always loved stories that tell the same evens from two differing points of view, but I have also noticed that it is incredibly hard to do well. This story I felt did it well.

One thing I came away with from this story, and I don't think anyone else picked up on it, but I felt that Loren knew everything that was going through Jessica's ind and did all this to 1) prove that humans still had their fighting spirit, and 2) commit suicide without actually doing the act himself. From Loren's narration, and despite his arrogance, I felt that he was still very much depressed by his first wife's death and in the end. How couldn't be if he had such a deep bond with her and suffered with her past her death.

Or did I just over think the story?
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« Reply #34 on: August 07, 2011, 02:03:50 AM »

Or did I just over think the story?

Nope, seems to me a valid interpretation and not one I'd thought of. Thanks! That's what's great about the forum, you get a load of different perspectives.

Oh, and LURV the avatar!
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stePH
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Cool story, bro!


« Reply #35 on: August 26, 2011, 09:28:38 PM »

Thought the story was great, but the issue I had was that these seemed to be fairies (of the old school) and not elves, and in my mind I had always differentiated the two.
It is the editorial position of PodCastle that Elves = Fey and Fey = Elves.


Actually, one quibble. I liked the two narrators and though it worked really well, but having the other narrator voice their character's speech felt a little off and was a little jarring. I would have preferred it if Graeme had done all of the first part, including Jessica's dialogue and Ann done all of the second part, including the elf's dialogue.
+1
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« Reply #36 on: August 29, 2011, 09:28:00 AM »

I enjoyed the "Loren" section MUCH more than the "Jessica" section. Perhaps it was the tone in which the character was read, but Jessica seemed to be a little too... perfect. She just HAPPENS to be picked by the Elf Warrior Lord, she just HAPPENS to have figured out how to shield her thoughts to just the right amount, she just HAPPENS to find a weapon that's good enough to kill her husband... Maybe "perfect" is the wrong word. Maybe "deus ex machina" is more accurate.

Whatever it is, I did not like the second half of the story. It became much less interesting when it was about humans rebelling against their Elven Overlords than when it was about Elven Overlords.
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LaShawn
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« Reply #37 on: August 29, 2011, 04:17:07 PM »

I enjoyed the "Loren" section MUCH more than the "Jessica" section. Perhaps it was the tone in which the character was read, but Jessica seemed to be a little too... perfect. She just HAPPENS to be picked by the Elf Warrior Lord, she just HAPPENS to have figured out how to shield her thoughts to just the right amount, she just HAPPENS to find a weapon that's good enough to kill her husband... Maybe "perfect" is the wrong word. Maybe "deus ex machina" is more accurate.

Whatever it is, I did not like the second half of the story. It became much less interesting when it was about humans rebelling against their Elven Overlords than when it was about Elven Overlords.

Ah, so in other words, you would welcome our Elven Overloads.

I have actually read this one on Fantasy Magazine, so I'm only listening because Graeme and Ann are narrating, and I do so like dual narratives. I personally found the story so-so, though I do like the style of the stereogram.
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #38 on: November 07, 2011, 10:19:03 AM »

Quite enjoyable, once the second half of the stereogram rolled around.  The first half I found a little slow, though the introduction of the stereogram concept I found very interesting, as well as the shared sensations.  It really got interesting for me when the second perspective arrived and I realized the same set of events were being told from a different POV.  This is very closely related to my feelings about POV and how you can convey each character's unique perspective, not with explicit thoughts, but with observations of surroundings and reactions to them.  Wonderfully done!

I liked how the mindlink did not actually convey thoughts, but only physical reactions.  Most emotions manifest as some kind of physical reaction, but some can be easily confused with others, a flushed face could be anger or embarrassment, etc...  You would think that this kind of link would bring you ever closer to the one you're linked to, because you're always sharing, but in some cases (this one included), it could distance you even further.  Without the link, I must actively observe to try to gauge my wife's mood, and if I am inattentive to the cues, that's where an argument often starts.  With the link, one could be fooled into thinking you really understand the other person to their core, and actually make you less observant as a result.

I find the idea of shared sensations at its core extremely attractive idea--especially for sex.  Imagine what a great lover one could be when you share sensations, and I have always wondered how things feel on behalf of the other sex (something which can never really be experienced in this world, but in the world of the story it is common).  I would probably not be so keen on the idea during menstruation and childbirth, but even then I imagine it could bring a couple closer, actually understanding what the other is going through.

I enjoyed the "Loren" section MUCH more than the "Jessica" section. Perhaps it was the tone in which the character was read, but Jessica seemed to be a little too... perfect. She just HAPPENS to be picked by the Elf Warrior Lord, she just HAPPENS to have figured out how to shield her thoughts to just the right amount, she just HAPPENS to find a weapon that's good enough to kill her husband... Maybe "perfect" is the wrong word. Maybe "deus ex machina" is more accurate.

Whatever it is, I did not like the second half of the story. It became much less interesting when it was about humans rebelling against their Elven Overlords than when it was about Elven Overlords.

It made perfect sense to me.  Loren craves human resistance more than she does; he's just been bored since the war ended.  Whether consciously or not, I believe he picked her because he knew she was capable of doing what she did, and he wanted to facilitate the rekindling of the war.  I didn't see his lack of foresight as being unobservant by nature, more that he is intentionally avoiding coming to the conclusion that she will try to kill him, so that he can really enjoy the moment when it comes.
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Dakota North
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« Reply #39 on: March 10, 2012, 06:37:12 PM »


After the fae overlords have been driven from our world lets follow them into theres and bring them the gift of iron.  GREAT STORY.
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