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Author Topic: EP307: Soulmates  (Read 6609 times)
birdless
Lochage
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Five is right out.


« Reply #60 on: September 28, 2011, 12:23:04 PM »

I still see his adaptability as being with the design of his programming, not counter to it.  Smiley
FWIW, I agree that the adaptability is a function of his programming, but I feel like he exceeded the expectations of his programming, not acted counter to it.
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #61 on: September 29, 2011, 08:41:31 AM »

I still see his adaptability as being with the design of his programming, not counter to it.  Smiley
FWIW, I agree that the adaptability is a function of his programming, but I feel like he exceeded the expectations of his programming, not acted counter to it.

Fair enough.  Smiley
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CryptoMe
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« Reply #62 on: September 30, 2011, 11:51:54 PM »

I liked this story. It was nice. It was fun.

But it had one big flaw: I can't believe that a large warehouse wouldn't have emergency lighting specifically for power outages. Isn't that part of industrial building codes or something?

It didn't ruin the story for me, but it was very difficult to ignore.
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #63 on: October 03, 2011, 08:40:12 AM »

But it had one big flaw: I can't believe that a large warehouse wouldn't have emergency lighting specifically for power outages. Isn't that part of industrial building codes or something?

That's a fair point.  Yes, I would think that would be a requirement.  Even when I lived in an apartment building the hallways had battery backup lighting, and it would be much more vital in a situation where one is surrounded by dangerous machinery.  Maybe it malfunctioned??  But if it's designed well there should be redundant backups, and apparently there weren't if that was the case.
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Thomas
Palmer
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« Reply #64 on: October 03, 2011, 10:56:21 AM »

But it had one big flaw: I can't believe that a large warehouse wouldn't have emergency lighting specifically for power outages. Isn't that part of industrial building codes or something?

Lights in a factory operated by robots? do they really need lighting? For security, maybe... but necessary for operation or safety in a part of the facility primarily used by robots?

but i agree, an oversight on the part of the author, but then, wouldn't security have flashlights?
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #65 on: October 03, 2011, 11:21:43 AM »

Lights in a factory operated by robots? do they really need lighting? For security, maybe... but necessary for operation or safety in a part of the facility primarily used by robots?

It depends on what kind of sensors the robots had.  If the robots rely primarily on optical sensors for situational awareness, then emergency lighting might matter for them to be able to navigate.
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--David Steffen
The Submissions Grinder:  Fiction market listings, submissions tracker, always free, poetry and nonfiction markets coming soon!
Thomas
Palmer
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« Reply #66 on: October 03, 2011, 04:32:25 PM »


It depends on what kind of sensors the robots had.  If the robots rely primarily on optical sensors for situational awareness, then emergency lighting might matter for them to be able to navigate.

didn't Mose operate independent of lighting?
which electromagnetic wave length would be the cheapest for the robots to operate under??

now we are nitpicking ....
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CryptoMe
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« Reply #67 on: October 03, 2011, 08:39:33 PM »

But it had one big flaw: I can't believe that a large warehouse wouldn't have emergency lighting specifically for power outages. Isn't that part of industrial building codes or something?

Lights in a factory operated by robots? do they really need lighting? For security, maybe... but necessary for operation or safety in a part of the facility primarily used by robots?

but i agree, an oversight on the part of the author, but then, wouldn't security have flashlights?

A part of the factory where the maintenance robot is not allowed to go? Yes, that would certainly need back-up lighting so that the humans, who would have to go fix things in case of an emergency, would be able to see.
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #68 on: October 04, 2011, 09:15:17 AM »


It depends on what kind of sensors the robots had.  If the robots rely primarily on optical sensors for situational awareness, then emergency lighting might matter for them to be able to navigate.

didn't Mose operate independent of lighting?
which electromagnetic wave length would be the cheapest for the robots to operate under??

now we are nitpicking ....

Less nitpicking, more overanalyzing.  (How about that, I nitpicked the nitpicking!)

I would think the cheapest would be visible light because there are lots of cheap commercial bulbs available, plus it doubles as being useful for the humans as well. 

Okay, I don't need to keep going.  But I'm having fun.  Smiley
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FireTurtle
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« Reply #69 on: October 05, 2011, 08:47:57 PM »

It was a fun little story. If you like Socratic arguments. If you don't examine the "plot" with a magnifyin glass. If you like being led like a sheep to an emotional conclusion.
Argh. I want to like it. I liked Asimov. IIRC there was more plot there in I, Robot. But, it was a book, not a short story.
My biggest, banging fist against steering wheel causing beef: since when does alcohol withdrawal make you philosophical and hungry? Just to be clear: it makes you ape-sh*t crazy nuts and sometimes you have seizures. Just saying, I found myself wondering if Moz had magical properties to cure physiologicL dependence because THAT my friends, is biological programming.
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Gamercow
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« Reply #70 on: October 11, 2011, 03:31:43 PM »


Argh. I want to like it. I liked Asimov. IIRC there was more plot there in I, Robot. But, it was a book, not a short story.


Common mistake.  I, Robot was a novel-sized collection of unrelated short stories about robots.  And a steaming turd of celluloid movie was ostensibly made from one of those 9 short stories.
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FireTurtle
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« Reply #71 on: October 11, 2011, 04:34:27 PM »


Argh. I want to like it. I liked Asimov. IIRC there was more plot there in I, Robot. But, it was a book, not a short story.


Common mistake.  I, Robot was a novel-sized collection of unrelated short stories about robots.  And a steaming turd of celluloid movie was ostensibly made from one of those 9 short stories.

I stand corrected. It's been a while.... And please, don't mention the Moving Picture of the same name...*shudders*
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“My imagination makes me human and makes me a fool; it gives me all the world and exiles me from it.”
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Thomas
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« Reply #72 on: October 11, 2011, 09:32:14 PM »


 I, Robot was a novel-sized collection of unrelated short stories about robots.

Check again, the stories were related. first it was about trouble shooting unforeseen glitches in the three laws of robotics and moved into the evolution of AI and how it controlled humanity through direct and indirect manipulation of human frailties and prejudices. amongst other things.
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HexD
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« Reply #73 on: October 17, 2011, 12:41:44 AM »

Once again, Resnick nails it. Love the story. Touching without being overly sentimental or sappy.
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Gamercow
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« Reply #74 on: October 17, 2011, 09:18:34 AM »


 I, Robot was a novel-sized collection of unrelated short stories about robots.

Check again, the stories were related. first it was about trouble shooting unforeseen glitches in the three laws of robotics and moved into the evolution of AI and how it controlled humanity through direct and indirect manipulation of human frailties and prejudices. amongst other things.

I guess I meant to say that the short stories when they were originally written were not specifically related to each other, as they were written over many years.  They were related in the sense you mention above, they were all robot stories by Asimov.
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Fenrix
Curmudgeon
EA Staff
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« Reply #75 on: February 20, 2012, 04:53:34 PM »


It depends on what kind of sensors the robots had.  If the robots rely primarily on optical sensors for situational awareness, then emergency lighting might matter for them to be able to navigate.

didn't Mose operate independent of lighting?
which electromagnetic wave length would be the cheapest for the robots to operate under??

now we are nitpicking ....

Less nitpicking, more overanalyzing.  (How about that, I nitpicked the nitpicking!)

I would think the cheapest would be visible light because there are lots of cheap commercial bulbs available, plus it doubles as being useful for the humans as well. 

Okay, I don't need to keep going.  But I'm having fun.  Smiley

With the continued improvements in illumination engineering, LED lamps would be quite feasible and operate effectively on a battery backup system when power is out. This is feasible now, let alone when we have near-sentient robots.
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