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Author Topic: PC174: The Parable of the Shower  (Read 7887 times)
danooli
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« Reply #40 on: September 19, 2011, 05:57:30 AM »

Aw, Emerald, what a shame.  If you get so offended by a simple word, maybe you're right in backing away from a place that celebrates words and how they are used.

I hope your, to my eye narrow, view of the world can expand someday.
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Devoted135
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« Reply #41 on: September 19, 2011, 11:25:16 AM »

.....getting back to the story....

I usually don't like stories that use thee's and thou's because it's simply too difficult to pull off if you haven't studied Middle English. But this story did it was so much sass that I couldn't help but smile throughout. Laurice White was the perfect reader, and she brought the story to life in a way I doubt many other readers could have done.


Fun fact: did you know that "thee" was the informal version of "you" back in the day, used to express familiarity or sometimes disrespect? "You" was the formal/plural version so if it weren't for "thee" falling out of use we wouldn't have all the plural colloquialisms such as y'all. (Yes, I wiki-checked my facts, but I did actually know that before I checked Cheesy).
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InfiniteMonkey
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Clearly, I need more typewriters....


« Reply #42 on: September 19, 2011, 11:43:54 AM »

Fun fact: did you know that "thee" was the informal version of "you" back in the day, used to express familiarity or sometimes disrespect?

Why, yes. Yes I did.

 Wink
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brlteach
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« Reply #43 on: September 19, 2011, 02:29:10 PM »

DKT, Thanks for the clarification.  I'll de-ruffle my feathers, now Smiley

BTW, I didn't find the story blasphemas.  Look forward to next episode.




I mentioned Card's faith not to slam Mormons and LDS in general, or you in particular. I brought it up because his faith and my own share a common text (as you pointed out). When someone claims to follow Jesus's teachings, loving one another seems to be toward the top of the list - no matter how different they are. Hating a group of people because they're different seems to run contrary.

I don't hate Card by any stretch of the imagination. I am disappointed in him, and this novella in particular.
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Talia
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I like pie


« Reply #44 on: September 19, 2011, 03:13:39 PM »

Hi everyone.

I've moved all the comments on the intro/the Mormon stuff to this thread.. Any further comments on on that subject can go there (and remember please, please be nice).

Thanks!
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olivaw
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« Reply #45 on: September 19, 2011, 08:43:50 PM »

The use of the second person makes me think more of the Qu'ran, which contains a great deal in the imperative mode, rather than the Bible (which is presumably what the Jacobean grammar is meant to suggest)
While the protagonist is a Christian, and the Second Coming is a Christian doctrine, most of the story is broad enough that it could be aimed at Islam, or Judaism, or any number of similar religions.
Equal opportunities blasphemy.  Cheesy
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Calculating...
Palmer
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Too much knowledge never makes for simple decision


« Reply #46 on: September 20, 2011, 04:25:34 PM »

So I'm taking time out of my Medieval Christian Thought class to comment on this story ( which I just giggle at the ridiculousness of it) and I have to say I loved this story. It was great watching the angels who were stuck in the "old world" ideas of religion i.e. angel of the lord says jump, subject says how high, regardless of previous religious beliefs, watching them come face to face with modern day thought. Also, LOVE Laurice White, I loved her after Saints and I think I love her even more now. I definitely think she brought something to this story that other readers just could not. I had so much fun with this story, it was just the laugh I needed. Loved it.
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I don't know who you are or where you came from, but from now on you'll do as I tell you, okay?
Listener
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« Reply #47 on: September 21, 2011, 10:19:26 AM »

This was a very funny, enjoyable story. The humor of writing it as a Biblical-style* parable definitely set it apart.

I idly wonder if the story was first written straight, and then thees and thous were added in editing.

* I guess. I've never read the thing.
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"Farts are a hug you can smell." -Wil Wheaton

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Kaa
Lochage
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Trusst in me, jusst in me.


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« Reply #48 on: September 21, 2011, 10:58:34 AM »

Dave's rant: HELL yes. A thousand times yes.

Favorite line: Thou cusseth out the Angel of the Lord.

Best. Podcastle. Story. Yet. Catapulted over all the rest to be my favorite. Laurice White's narration really did it for me (again).

It's seldom that I drive on the traffic-laden streets of Atlanta cackling aloud in my car, no doubt causing other drivers to shy away from me if they notice. The Squonk stories did it, a few others did it...and this one.

Thou cusseth out the Angel of the Lord, indeed. Smiley
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ElectricPaladin
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« Reply #49 on: September 21, 2011, 11:00:39 AM »

It was great watching the angels who were stuck in the "old world" ideas of religion i.e. angel of the lord says jump, subject says how high...

I'm glad you didn't say "old testament." The characters in the Hebrew bible did a lot of arguing with God and the angels. As a Jew, perhaps that's part of why I loved this story so much. The main character reminded me of early Abraham.
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Listener
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I place things in locations which later elude me.


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« Reply #50 on: September 21, 2011, 01:35:32 PM »

It's seldom that I drive on the traffic-laden streets of Atlanta cackling aloud in my car, no doubt causing other drivers to shy away from me if they notice.

So THAT'S who I was moving over to get away from...
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"Farts are a hug you can smell." -Wil Wheaton

Blog || Quote Blog ||  Written and Audio Work || Twitter: @listener42
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Palmer
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Too much knowledge never makes for simple decision


« Reply #51 on: September 21, 2011, 03:19:22 PM »

Shalom ElectricPaladin. I think that is probably why we both loved it. Most people these days seem to have actually read the old testament, rarely understanding that the old testament god gets in a lot of arguments with his chosen people. Ah, such is the burden we share. Now for some reason I feel the need to call my mother...
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I don't know who you are or where you came from, but from now on you'll do as I tell you, okay?
Talia
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I like pie


« Reply #52 on: September 22, 2011, 01:28:47 PM »

Highly amusing. Brightened my day - just really enjoyable. Great reading too.

Nothing terribly insightful to say, but I really wanted to express my appreciation, because it brought some much-needed laughs.
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imstillreading
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« Reply #53 on: September 24, 2011, 08:10:28 PM »

Wow - awesome story! I laughed out loud. I enjoyed the characters, good dialogue, great twists, and a fresh approach (with hope!) to old stories and old structures.
Love it.
(To all the haters out there: if you can't empathize, be someone else for a few minutes, or enjoy a story as a story, don't read fiction. Oh, and, I send love to you anyway.)
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birdless
Lochage
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Five is right out.


« Reply #54 on: September 27, 2011, 03:56:59 PM »

Dammit I completely forgot what I was going to say here in my commentary. Oh well, I used some profanity, anyway, so I guess that compromises any validation I may have had.

Oh, I remember part of what I was going to day. It was a question about whether anything should be held sacred or not. I can't remember who said that all things should be off-limits (nothing should be held sacred, I'm sorry I couldn't find the direct quote), but I'm not sure I agree with this. For sake of argument, I'm going to skip explanations of what I hold sacred due to my faith, and just use this example: my mother was one of the most precious people who ever lived (and while I easily admit to some prejudice in this, MANY others who knew her and held no prejudice would agree with me). If someone were to write about her in a disrespectful manner, I would have major issues with that person. This is the closest thing I can think of to demonstrate the concept of something sacred in a secular setting. Hopefully the inference here is obvious: there is surely something or someone sacred to nearly everyone. Just because we have the freedom to write disrespectfully about someone doesn't mean we should, does it?

So anyway, since I said all that, I guess I'll offer my opinion on the story. I did find it humorous and well-written (in a kind of tongue-in-cheek way) and the narration was excellent. Being a Christian, I can't say that I was completely comfortable with some of the irreverence, but I would definitely classify it as "Mostly Harmless."  Smiley
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jenfullmoon
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« Reply #55 on: September 28, 2011, 10:23:53 AM »

This is now one of my favorite stories on this site. It tickles me no end and the language use cracked me up. Worked great for me, especially second person in this case Smiley

I also really liked the narration on this one. Gorgeous!

Favorite line: "It is not thy job to tell an angel of the LORD that thou likest not the boys."
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Destructo The Mad
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« Reply #56 on: September 28, 2011, 12:07:14 PM »

Holy cow did I enjoy this story!  When I wasn't laughing out loud, I was chuckling to myself.  Thank God I listened to this story while driving and walking the dogs.  Wonderful story, beautifully read.

I'm coming to the realization that audiobook (or podcast) is the best format for short fiction.

Thank you again, Podcastle. 

Dave's preamble (it wasn't a rant - it was too clear, reasoned and cogent to be a rant) was an added bonus.

Bravo.
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FireTurtle
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« Reply #57 on: September 28, 2011, 12:17:25 PM »

I think its all been said already. But, this: I want a life size oil painting of the shower scene. I'm thinking...Botticelli's Venus but with Loofa and Indignant Expression.  I NEED this. Anyone?

Loved the reading, loved the story. And yes, the line that made me laugh the loudest (they all made me smile or laugh) was the DAYCARE line. Oh my. Priceless.

And hey, Dave, props for calling it like you see it. Human beings disagree with each other- unity of thought is not part of our nature. Witness the fact that we have a forum for "discussion", not "universal and united agreement of PodCastle episode qualities". My personal creed runs much towards the "I'm really happy you believe whatever it is if you believe if you aren't a hypocrite and you aren't an asshole about it." So, you're on the side of the righteous with me.

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“My imagination makes me human and makes me a fool; it gives me all the world and exiles me from it.”
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Gamercow
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« Reply #58 on: September 28, 2011, 05:49:53 PM »

Loved this one, and damned be the naysayers, for thouest hast no sense of humour. 

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The cow says "Mooooooooo"
Raymond
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« Reply #59 on: September 30, 2011, 11:25:17 PM »

Brilliant story, performed by a miracle worker, introduced by a sage.
Thank you so much for this episode of PodCastle. 
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