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Author Topic: PC Miniature 66: The Witch’s Second Daughter  (Read 4946 times)

Ocicat

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on: October 24, 2011, 06:16:13 PM
PodCastle Miniature 66: The Witch’s Second Daughter

by Marissa K. Lingen

Read by Jen Rhodes (of the Anomaly Podcast)

Originally published in Andromeda Spaceways #49

The flowers of the forest outside the witch’s cottage bloomed black, with little shiny purple leaves.  The villagers tried to say the blossoms themselves were deep purple, not a true black, but Garren was the second daughter of a witch, schooled from birth that she must never, never call things what she knew they were not.

Telven, Garren’s older sister, had the other half of the witch’s training, and that was to always, always call things what she knew they were not.  Telven called an carven oak a man and made of him a husband, who was solid and dependable though not, perhaps, as swift as some.  She called a cave a home, and made it cozy and neat, though she could not keep cheese in it more than two days for the mold.  She called their mother wise and listened to her council.

The way of the second daughter was harder.


Rated PG



Kaa

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Reply #1 on: October 25, 2011, 03:00:38 PM
I enjoyed this one quite a bit. I think Jen Rhodes's reading really added to my enjoyment. It was a fairly predictable tale, but it was, essentially, a fairy tale, and those are allowed--and even expected--to be predictable. :)

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eytanz

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Reply #2 on: October 26, 2011, 11:05:45 AM
Very enjoyable. For such a short piece, it manages to capture a lot of world building and character development. It reminds me of some of the recent work by Patricia McKillip, who is one of my favourite writers.

At the end of it, I felt like I listened to a complete story; I didn't feel like anything was missing. But at the same time, I felt a lot of affection for these characters, and really wouldn't have minded spending more time with them.



Unblinking

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Reply #3 on: October 26, 2011, 01:09:36 PM
Cute.  I read this one in ASIM.  Because of the statement that one of the daughters could say only what is not true, I found that I spent most of my time overanalyzing every word, and it didn't seem like she actually only spoke what was not true as had been stated, which left me rather confused. 

An oddity:  I always get this one mixed up with another Marissa Lingen story, one that ran on BCS.  That one was "The Witch's Second", this one is "The Witch's Second Daughter". 



Kaa

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Reply #4 on: October 26, 2011, 01:35:52 PM
I think it was that she could only speak what was not true as far as her power went. Thus, she could not say to her daughter, you're strong enough. But the sister, who could only speak the truth as far as her power, could.

Or maybe *I* am overanalyzing it. :)

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raetsel

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Reply #5 on: October 26, 2011, 08:13:21 PM
A great little story. Perfect length. As Kaa said it was a fairy tale or folk tale.

I love stories like this that just throw you in with a set of "axioms" like there's a witch and she has two daughters so has to split the power or the daughter makes a husband out of an oak tree. Of course what else would you expect. :)

I did wonder if, as a consequence of the 2nd daughter telling her niece she was the daughter of an oak and so had strength, we would find the 1st daughter's husband turned back into a tree afterwards because of her power.

The narration was excellent and the southern drawl of the sisters was a great touch really added to the atmosphere of the piece.



eytanz

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Reply #6 on: October 26, 2011, 10:14:38 PM
I think it was that she could only speak what was not true as far as her power went. Thus, she could not say to her daughter, you're strong enough. But the sister, who could only speak the truth as far as her power, could.

Or maybe *I* am overanalyzing it. :)

I think you're right - both sisters could say whatever they want as long as they were just speaking. The first sister's magic, however, made false things become true. She can create a ledge by saying that there is one when there isn't.

The second sister's power is more subtle - she reveals true things. She didn't give the daughter strength, she gave her the awareness of her own strength.



Unblinking

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Reply #7 on: October 27, 2011, 01:24:22 PM
I think it was that she could only speak what was not true as far as her power went. Thus, she could not say to her daughter, you're strong enough. But the sister, who could only speak the truth as far as her power, could.

Or maybe *I* am overanalyzing it. :)

I think you're right - both sisters could say whatever they want as long as they were just speaking. The first sister's magic, however, made false things become true. She can create a ledge by saying that there is one when there isn't.

The second sister's power is more subtle - she reveals true things. She didn't give the daughter strength, she gave her the awareness of her own strength.

I think you're probably right, but trying to understand the basics of this took most of my attention while listening.  "Wait, can she say that?  I'm pretty sure that's true."



Devoted135

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Reply #8 on: October 31, 2011, 02:45:32 PM
LOVED this. ;D Honestly, I think this might be my favorite short that PC has ever run.

Words are really powerful, whether we're speaking truth into someone's life to encourage and empower them, or falsehoods that negatively impact everyone in earshot, and this story really captured that lesson.



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Reply #9 on: November 22, 2011, 03:18:00 PM
I loved this story, probably because I could see truth about my life in it.  I am a single, childless aunt to a curly-headed, strong-willed girl (and a dimple-cheeked, leaf-and-rock-inspecting boy) and my sister (the mother of the curly-headed, strong-willed girl) is often frustrated with her daughter's desire to think for herself.  The final lines, where the sisters talk about how they both of them want what is best for the young one, might have made me a bit teary.  I can understand the desire to provide the many young ones I play crazy aunt to, biologically related or no, with firm places to stand and a knowledge of one's own strength to work through seemingly impossible situations.  Very nicely done, Marissa.  Thank you.



kibitzer

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Reply #10 on: November 23, 2011, 01:56:44 AM
Cute.  I read this one in ASIM.

Aha!! I thought it sounded familiar.


FireTurtle

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Reply #11 on: November 24, 2011, 02:59:43 AM
Yay for the surprisingly complex short story. What fun! It made me think, the truth/false thing, and yet remained internally consistent in the context of the story! Hurrah.

And, as someone whose sister is her opposite in so many ways (and yet beloved) and provides my rental children in the form of nieces and nephews, I found this one somehow resonating with my own life. Good job.

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Unblinking

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Reply #12 on: December 09, 2011, 05:26:30 PM

... huh?  What do you mean "the first 10 episodes"?  Free downloads are available on the podcastle.org website.

Am I failing at reading comprehension or is this a spambot?


Mod: It's spam. I went ahead and removed the quote from your post. No need to give the scumbag any more attention. :)
« Last Edit: December 09, 2011, 05:29:52 PM by Talia »



LaShawn

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Reply #13 on: January 25, 2012, 05:06:54 PM
I had to listen to this a couple of times to catch what was going on. I kept getting the sisters mixed up, so I didn't know who was talking or which one had what power. Not to say I didn't enjoy it, but I may need to read it for the full effect.

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