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Author Topic: Pseudopod 262: Black Hill  (Read 5820 times)
indiecowgirl
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« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2012, 09:35:38 PM »

Loved this story and the way it was read made it even better. I love stories that make me think about how it could fit into the world of H.P. Lovecraft. Thanks for a great story!
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2012, 11:01:31 AM »

Oh, I realized it, it just wasn't a big concern for me - the stories share similarities of concept, but differences of approach.  What sold me on "The Sound of Gears" was the characterization of the functionary who serves a monstrous evil, and tries to mitigate the damage caused by that force by preempting its actions, while realizing that nothing can completely stop it.  What sold me on "Black Hill" was the previously noted powerful final vision of a world yet to come - scaling new heights of expansion but powered by the dead.

Fair enough.  For me these stories were so incredibly similar that one of them seems pretty much redundant (though I'm not sure which one).  Tongue
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MuseofChaos
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« Reply #22 on: January 10, 2012, 11:19:56 AM »

I also have to be the Keeper whenever we play Mansions of Madness because Rich won't play CoC for real.

If you don't mind losing an evening, go for the excellent "Arkham Horror" board game and it's now at least half dozen add-ons. It's a cooperative board game (you the players versus a randomly dealt GOO/Elder God/etc.) with options for individual goals as well.  Great game. I just wish it didn't take a bloody hour to set up and take down.
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Alea Iacta Est!
DKT
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« Reply #23 on: January 10, 2012, 11:57:22 AM »

Oh, I realized it, it just wasn't a big concern for me - the stories share similarities of concept, but differences of approach.  What sold me on "The Sound of Gears" was the characterization of the functionary who serves a monstrous evil, and tries to mitigate the damage caused by that force by preempting its actions, while realizing that nothing can completely stop it.  What sold me on "Black Hill" was the previously noted powerful final vision of a world yet to come - scaling new heights of expansion but powered by the dead.

Fair enough.  For me these stories were so incredibly similar that one of them seems pretty much redundant (though I'm not sure which one).  Tongue

They were seven months apart from each other!  Cheesy  I'm glad I got to hear both of them.

I always enjoy hearing Orrin Grey gracing the Pseudopod towers. Nice reading by Rich, too.
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #24 on: January 10, 2012, 12:06:38 PM »

They were seven months apart from each other!  Cheesy  I'm glad I got to hear both of them.

I always enjoy hearing Orrin Grey gracing the Pseudopod towers. Nice reading by Rich, too.

Indeed.  Which I guess, doesn't seem that far apart to me.  Different perspectives on time, I guess.  To a geologist, the evolution of humanity wasn't all that long ago, but a cicada would feel otherwise.  Smiley
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kibitzer
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« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2012, 05:13:15 PM »

To a geologist, the evolution of humanity wasn't all that long ago, but a cicada would feel otherwise.  Smiley

I didn't see Devoted135 in this thread yet...
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Scattercat
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« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2012, 06:49:02 PM »

I also have to be the Keeper whenever we play Mansions of Madness because Rich won't play CoC for real.

If you don't mind losing an evening, go for the excellent "Arkham Horror" board game and it's now at least half dozen add-ons. It's a cooperative board game (you the players versus a randomly dealt GOO/Elder God/etc.) with options for individual goals as well.  Great game. I just wish it didn't take a bloody hour to set up and take down.

Arkham Horror suffers from the Dice Problem.  The last time I played, I got zapped to another dimension randomly and spent the next four hours attempting to roll a 5 or a 6 whenever my turn came around.  25-30 minutes of waiting, one die roll, one sigh, and passing the turn on.
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Sgarre1
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« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2012, 08:47:52 PM »

Quote
For me these stories were so incredibly similar that one of them seems pretty much redundant (though I'm not sure which one).

And *that's* the part that I find interesting.  Not that you're obligated, but if you do any more cogitating on the subject and come up with something, please post if you are so inclined.
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Fenrix
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« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2012, 08:59:17 PM »

I liked both Black Hill and The Sound of Gears. Black Hill had a pulpier Lovecraft tone. I loved the resonance with the drilling rig hitting home to the opening of the door in The Call of Cthulhu. The Sound of Gears, felt more like gritty noir to me. My preference lies with Lovecraft, although I dig gritty noir.

Choices like this make it difficult for me to narrow down to three stories for the "best of" nomination list.
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Sir Postsalot
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« Reply #29 on: January 11, 2012, 10:21:32 AM »

Quote
For me these stories were so incredibly similar that one of them seems pretty much redundant (though I'm not sure which one).

And *that's* the part that I find interesting.  Not that you're obligated, but if you do any more cogitating on the subject and come up with something, please post if you are so inclined.

Mostly, the wording of that was a joke.  If the stories are redundant, than they can only be redundant in combination, and so are both equally culpable for the redundancy.  Smiley  

Like I said, I think I like "Black Hill" just a fingernail-thickness better because it's explanation of the dead/ghostly matter building up in the oil seemed more convincing/eloquent than in The Sound of Gears.  

Just 2 days ago, I posted a Best of Pseudopod 2011 list, and this story was on it as an honorable mention, but "The Sound of Gears" is not.  As I was narrowing down the year's stories for the list, both this one and The Sound of Gears were on it til the very end.  But I was aiming to make the list one entry shorter, and so the choice came down to eliminating one of these or the other because I felt they were pretty much the same--if someone reads the list looking for a good sampling of Pseudopod, I figured it would serve them better to not have basically the same story twice in this collection of 8.  So I set the two on a metaphorical balance scale and measured very carefully to decide which one ended up on the list.  If this story had not been published (or had not been published until after the year's end), then "The Sound of Gears" would've been on the list instead.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2012, 10:23:23 AM by Unblinking » Logged

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Sgarre1
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« Reply #30 on: January 11, 2012, 06:38:28 PM »

BTW - thanks for that best of list (which I will pimp where I can)!  And I was actually interested in your distinctions between the two, I wasn't being sarcastic or anything - so thanks for those as well!
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Millenium_King
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« Reply #31 on: January 11, 2012, 10:02:04 PM »

I am a huge fan of this story.  It's a great example of a Mythos story done absolutely correctly.  The desolate place, the slow build to otherworldly horror.  It was very well done.  Orrin's other story ("The Worm that Gnaws") is my all-time favorite story on Pseudopod.  And, like this story, the narration there was top-notch and really sold the story.

However, like "The Worm that Gnaws" I'm not sure how well this one would have done in text as opposed to being read aloud.  But I think this is a great success for the audio medium.  Great job Orrin!  Great job Pseudopod!
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kibitzer
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« Reply #32 on: January 12, 2012, 02:30:37 AM »

I am a huge fan of this story.  It's a great example of a Mythos story done absolutely correctly.  The desolate place, the slow build to otherworldly horror.  It was very well done.  Orrin's other story ("The Worm that Gnaws") is my all-time favorite story on Pseudopod.  And, like this story, the narration there was top-notch and really sold the story.

However, like "The Worm that Gnaws" I'm not sure how well this one would have done in text as opposed to being read aloud.  But I think this is a great success for the audio medium.  Great job Orrin!  Great job Pseudopod!

Isn't it amazing how much a great narration adds to a story? It's very interesting to watch the EA "Best Of..." polls this time of year and consider the effect of the narration on how much people like it.
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justenjoying
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« Reply #33 on: January 15, 2012, 04:40:03 PM »

This was very similar to Terrible Lizard King in the way it ends. This is a much more stark story to say the least, but
I love the Horror in the everyday life, finding the dead things that is not only a part of our everyday life but what makes it
run for us. I won't mangle Alistair's outro, but suffice it to say it stuck with me as much as this story. Maybe there is a finer line
between dead and alive as we chose to see.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2012, 02:02:23 PM by justenjoying » Logged
JesseLivingston
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« Reply #34 on: January 16, 2012, 06:40:16 PM »

*SPOILER ALERT* Didn't "Terrible Lizard King" end with the boy eating the T-Rex?

I guess I'm missing the similarity, unless you mean the part about consuming dinosaurs?
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Jesse Livingston
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justenjoying
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« Reply #35 on: January 17, 2012, 01:22:27 AM »

more about the horror is all around us,
the boys relization that things run on dinosaurs and that we are made from the same stuff dinos were once made of.
before he eats the t-rex
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Scattercat
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« Reply #36 on: January 17, 2012, 10:02:24 AM »

In fairness, Orrin Grey was probably not inspired by this comic, as I was.
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JesseLivingston
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« Reply #37 on: January 17, 2012, 03:49:24 PM »

Nice! (the comic)

You're right. I should have gone back and listened to the story before I opened my big mouth.
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Jesse Livingston
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orrin
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« Reply #38 on: January 19, 2012, 02:51:45 PM »

First of all, thanks for all the very nice words about the story!

Generally, when I'm writing stories, even Lovecraftian ones, I tend to try to avoid overt references. Throwing out names like Miskatonic or Cthulhu or whatever. But in this case, I was writing this story specifically for the Historical Lovecraft anthology, and I thought that the "that is not dead which can eternal lie" line was just so appropriate for the theme of the story that I couldn't resist using it.
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orrin
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« Reply #39 on: January 19, 2012, 04:08:20 PM »

Also, for those of you who might be curious to see the story in print, in a stunning bit of serendipity the version of it that's going to appear in my forthcoming collection just went up as a stand-alone story for the Kindle on Amazon. It's got original art accompanying it, as well as some author's notes, and it's absolutely free for the time being, so check it out if you're interested: http://www.amazon.com/Black-Hill-ebook/dp/B006YZIF6G/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1327007091&sr=8-5
« Last Edit: January 19, 2012, 04:14:31 PM by orrin » Logged

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