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Author Topic: EP686/EP377: Real Artists (Flashback Friday)  (Read 13904 times)

Dave

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Reply #60 on: February 02, 2013, 12:51:24 AM

-Dave (aka Nev the Deranged)


CutGlass

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Reply #61 on: February 15, 2013, 12:02:27 PM
I listened to this story a few days ago while commuting, and then this morning came across a news story that's so close that I created an account purely to post it here on the forum (after over 7 years of listening).

I can't post a link, but it's easy to find if you search the BBC News website for an article by Colin Grant entitled "Many Worlds: The movie that watches its audience". Basically, a team at Plymouth University are working to develop a system along the lines of one described in Ken Liu's story.



Just Jeff

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Reply #62 on: February 16, 2013, 12:18:44 AM
CutGlass, I caught the tail end of an NPR segment today on Many Worlds, and yeah, it brought me right back here.

The audio archive is here: http://tinyurl.com/d68byc8

Summary: "Many Worlds is a 15-minute drama from Alexis Kirke, of the Interdisciplinary Center for Computer Music Research at Plymouth University in England. The film, about a bizarre physics experiment cooked up by a depressed girl and unleashed on her friends, 'reads the minds' and the bodies of the audience, and changes its plot while they watch it.



acpracht

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Reply #63 on: February 16, 2013, 12:29:16 AM
CutGlass, I caught the tail end of an NPR segment today on Many Worlds, and yeah, it brought me right back here.

The audio archive is here: http://tinyurl.com/d68byc8

Summary: "Many Worlds is a 15-minute drama from Alexis Kirke, of the Interdisciplinary Center for Computer Music Research at Plymouth University in England. The film, about a bizarre physics experiment cooked up by a depressed girl and unleashed on her friends, 'reads the minds' and the bodies of the audience, and changes its plot while they watch it.
Crap. You beat me to it.
My jaw dropped when I heard this.



childoftyranny

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Reply #64 on: April 11, 2013, 11:23:44 PM
I'm in the camp that would call this terrifying, but not because I'm afraid of computers creating things or replacing people as I already see this as happening with movies and visual media. I see it happening with movies of course, especially the disturbing amount or remakes, but I also see it occurring with memes and youtube media, as well as the remix styles of music. I tend to find these styles pretty "meh" so the idea of more and more of it makes me groan! I didn't really see the reveal coming, but unfortunately other than seeing the connection with things I don't really enjoy I didn't care so much either.

I didn't with this character because I never really fell in love with a movie, I can't recall being blown away by any that I saw, and so far my overall experience has been I still enjoy the movies I enjoyed a while back so I've luckily(?) missed out on a lot of the ruined nostalgia moments of things, a good example being Star Wars.

In the end its sort of interesting that I found the story somewhat thought provoking even if I didn't really care for the story, so that's sort of a success!



Fenrix

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Reply #65 on: June 03, 2013, 12:10:37 AM
I started out at 1A but after reading this you make me consider 1B. Maybe after a few more iterations I'll have a better idea...

Also I think Cryptome had the meta-winner response.

All cat stories start with this statement: “My mother, who was the first cat, told me this...”


hardware

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Reply #66 on: June 11, 2013, 12:57:13 PM
Yeah, this one was probably more interesting as a thought experiment than as a story. Now I didn't see the brain manipulation as anything else than a lazy plot device, and therefore it didn't horrify as it would, if taken seriously. What I think is the most interesting question raised here, and one that the story never really adresses, is about the importance of taste in Art versus the importance of the craft. While traditional film making (including the CGI heavy productions of today) puts very high emphasis on craft, the process here seems to completely focus on the possibility to discern good from bad. But what would be lost in that process ? A lot of great art is made struggling against the limitations of the art form, struggling with expressing yourself within the limitations inherent in a medium. It is stated in the story that the greatest asset of a great artist is great taste. But is that really true ?   



CryptoMe

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Reply #67 on: February 02, 2020, 09:50:19 PM
It was interesting to go back and look at what I wrote in response to this story the first time it aired....

I have to agree with my earlier sentiments here and disagree with Alasdairs's summary that this is positive. In the story, for example, they make an analogy to John Henry vs the steam-powered hammers for laying railroads. I feel this analogy fails miserably with respect to art. After all, art is not the same thing as railroad track. The track laying just needs to be adequate, each section of track can be exactly the same as all the others (should actually be the same), and the success of track laying is evaluated simply by quantity completed. This decidedly does not describe good art.  At all.