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Author Topic: EP413: Why I Left Harry’s All-Night Hamburgers  (Read 16239 times)

SonofSpermcube

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Reply #40 on: January 08, 2014, 04:31:42 PM
This is the story that finally compelled after years of lurking to comment on thread. I am a few months behind but this story outraged me. First I was so happy about West Virginia being a setting for science fiction story but when it turned out that only nearly all universes Sutton West Virginia is in the middle of nowhere.

I love this state, and hate the reality that kids need to move to Pittsburgh for them to have a life and career. So frustrating!

The first time I drove through West Virginia, I was stunned by the scenery.  Like had to stop the car on top of a hill and just look at it.  For comparison:  I am from Alaska. 



matweller

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Reply #41 on: January 08, 2014, 05:14:54 PM
I'll never leave the Appalachians. I've never seen anything in my travels or on TV that makes me think any other part of the world has more to offer for me.



SonofSpermcube

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Reply #42 on: January 09, 2014, 04:48:19 AM
When I was in West Virginia, I stopped in a diner, and I had a hamburger. 

Also you guys have, or had, a kick-ass public radio announcer.  I'm sure you know the one I mean.  That guy is even more awesome than Wichita Rutherford.



Unblinking

  • Sir Postsalot
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Reply #43 on: January 09, 2014, 03:37:49 PM
I imagine many parallel universes where the Kingdom of Appalachia rules the world. Some universes where the kingdom enslaves the waterlogged ruins of the East Coast, others with stem punk trains and other fantasy universes where "clean coal" actually exists.

I agree that there are other parallel universes where the Kingdom of Appalachia rules the world.  But, in my mind at least, the between-world travel heavily biases towards similarity and those worlds are dissimilar enough to be much more difficult to travel to from here, or to travel from to here.



CryptoMe

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Reply #44 on: January 15, 2014, 04:36:15 AM
Like most people, I enjoyed this story.

Personally, I liked the ending, mostly because I assumed Benares was in another dimension - don't ask me why, I just did. So to me, the guy traveled around his own dimension, and then decided to try the other ones after all. And I thought that was neat, the best of both worlds.

You know, I am just going to go a head and keep assuming that's what he did. It makes me happier. So there ;)



hardware

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Reply #45 on: March 10, 2014, 07:05:13 PM
So, this was one of those middle-of-the-road stories, sympathetic, competent and a little bit safe. I won't remember it for long, but had a nice enough time listening to it. 



MichaelFoster

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Reply #46 on: March 21, 2014, 07:12:49 PM
I registered just so that I could comment on this story.

This is one of the best short stories I have ever read/heard. Both aspiring and accomplished fiction writers should study this piece.

The writing is simple and vivid; from the very beginning the author gives us a very clear, coherent, easy-to-visualize description of this world. This is a problem with a number of submissions to EscapePod; no matter how imaginative or foreign your world is, you should be able to describe it well enough that your audience can quickly immerse themselves in its landscape. Few writers do this well; this story did it effortlessly.

The premise itself is simple and elegant. I am not a fan of the parallel universe motif, and I think the concept is silly (I like Occam's razor), but it is used here to express the human theme of curiosity and discovery in a way that should appeal to just about anyone.

The character development is realistic and relatable. As a bildungsroman, the story expresses young men's desire to explore elegantly and sensitively. Likewise, it expresses the melancholy and complexities of travel and leaving home from the narrator's and the traveler's perspectives with great clarity and accuracy.

Finally, the twist at the end is brilliant, and it leaves us wondering why the narrator finally decided to travel to a parallel world, and it encourages us to ask ourselves if we would travel to foreign places if it meant we could never come home again--and what compels people do to so or not do so. In other words, it forces us to empathize with travelers and non-travelers alike.

It's a beautiful story and a towering accomplishment. I've become a paid subscriber. Thanks.



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Reply #47 on: March 25, 2014, 03:46:43 PM
I registered just so that I could comment on this story.


Welcome! I hope you stick around!  I love discussing stories with people here, and the more the merrier!