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Author Topic: EP482: Chimeras  (Read 52109 times)

Unblinking

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Reply #20 on: March 04, 2015, 04:05:08 PM
Please accept my sincerest apologies, I was parking the car at the time and may have lost the linear thread.

No worries, dude.  Nothing to apologize for.

In any case, whether or not other mods had been applied, the cat mods plus "cat-calling" was hard to not take as a groaner pun for me.



Max e^{i pi}

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Reply #21 on: March 04, 2015, 05:57:28 PM
Please accept my sincerest apologies, I was parking the car at the time and may have lost the linear thread.

No worries, dude.  Nothing to apologize for.

In any case, whether or not other mods had been applied, the cat mods plus "cat-calling" was hard to not take as a groaner pun for me.

Are there other kinds of puns (not groaners)?

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Reply #22 on: March 04, 2015, 06:35:40 PM
Are there other kinds of puns (not groaners)?

To me there are, yes.  There's a spectrum from "smirkers" to "groaners".  I don't think any of them would've been good here, mind you.  And maybe the author didn't intend a pun at all. 



Max e^{i pi}

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Reply #23 on: March 04, 2015, 06:37:16 PM
Are there other kinds of puns (not groaners)?

To me there are, yes.  There's a spectrum from "smirkers" to "groaners".  I don't think any of them would've been good here, mind you.  And maybe the author didn't intend a pun at all. 

My spectrum runs the gamut from groaners to "go sit in the corner and think about what you've done".

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Chairman Goodchild

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Reply #24 on: March 05, 2015, 02:28:00 PM
I think my favorite thing about this story is that the chimera modifications are not purely cosmetic in nature.
Her whiskers get attached to her brain, and the brain can decipher this new sensory input. The ears can swivel and hear better. And so on.
This isn't about people modifying the way they look, it's about modifying the way they perceive the world...

I'm agreeing with Max here, and I have to pick a bone with the people that called this procedure mere plastic surgery.  This is the kind of stuff plastic surgeons only dream they could do.  Making completely new tissues with working epithelial, nervous, muscle and circulatory systems and then hooking that up to a working organism is way into the science fiction territory.  And like I said before, this is the sort of science fiction that I really like.  There's nothing impossible about it, and if this level of technology were ever achieved and brought down to the level where an average person could afford it, bet your ass you'd see some freaky shit going on.  
« Last Edit: March 05, 2015, 02:33:03 PM by Chairman Goodchild »



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Reply #25 on: March 05, 2015, 03:14:28 PM
I'm agreeing with Max here, and I have to pick a bone with the people that called this procedure mere plastic surgery.  This is the kind of stuff plastic surgeons only dream they could do.  Making completely new tissues with working epithelial, nervous, muscle and circulatory systems and then hooking that up to a working organism is way into the science fiction territory.  And like I said before, this is the sort of science fiction that I really like.  There's nothing impossible about it, and if this level of technology were ever achieved and brought down to the level where an average person could afford it, bet your ass you'd see some freaky shit going on.  

I'd pay a downpayment on the swivel ears right now!  I had a papillon a few years ago, and even when she was napping her ears would point toward any noises--her eyes would stay shut unless the noise was unusual or exciting in some way because she was confident that her ears were enough to suss out exciting from the mundane.  I always thought those ears would be a cool biological trait. 

I agree that it's much more than just cosmetic surgery.  Changes certainly have a cosmetic effect, but when you're installing new sensory organs you are recalibrating your experience of the world--that's way more than cosmetic.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2015, 03:16:11 PM by Unblinking »



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Reply #26 on: March 06, 2015, 09:51:34 AM
Are there other kinds of puns (not groaners)?

To me there are, yes.  There's a spectrum from "smirkers" to "groaners".  I don't think any of them would've been good here, mind you.  And maybe the author didn't intend a pun at all. 

My spectrum runs the gamut from groaners to "go sit in the corner and think about what you've done".
There's also the "bunt" see the Blurry Photos podcast www.blurryphotos.org for more...



Devoted135

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Reply #27 on: March 09, 2015, 09:17:16 PM
I think there is a fine line when it comes to experimenting with any form of self-modification. I see the mods in this story as a fairly flexible metaphor that can stand in for pretty much any form of experimenting: tattoos, clothing or hair style, even style of speech. We play with these elements both as a method of expressing ourselves better and as a method of finding external approval. The fine line comes in when we go too far because we are seeking acceptance through these modifications.

That's how I interpret that last line. She's concerned her friend is only modding to find outside approval, and also maybe wondering if she herself hasn't crossed that line as well.



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Reply #28 on: April 14, 2015, 07:52:41 PM
I like the story  but felt the  reference was more towards  Furry fandom (which I am part of) than cosmetic surgery. The mods like whiskers  were also functional than just cosmetic and the comment about hunting  Chimeras and other  "cat" calls  can come  straight out the moth of a anti-furry troll.
   An often conversations that pops up on furry boards is if the technology  was available would one transform themselves into an anthropomorphic  animal and issue one would face. 



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Reply #29 on: October 08, 2015, 05:18:41 PM
I liked this one.

I think the main topic is self esteem and wanting to belong. 
The changes are not a plastic surgery operations just for the outside looks, but a need to change oneself as a whole. They change how the character sees the surrounding world, and how she is seen by others.

Problem is, she is not choosing to change because of herself, but first because of her break up, and latter because she wanted to belong.

In the end she realizes that she is not happier than before.



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Reply #30 on: February 11, 2016, 07:59:55 PM
I wasn't a great fan of this story. I'm not big on the theme of changing yourself to find yourself or gain acceptance - it just doesn't speak to me.

I also don't think that sexism was the main theme of this story. While Max e{iPi} did a great job of pointing out the inherent sexism of the story's world, it felt to me that the sexism was just a tool to illuminate the changes the main character was going through. The main reason I think this is because the sexism was too blatant. In our real world, you can no longer get away with cat calls (wolf whistles if you want to avoid cat puns) or hitting on your subordinates, so sexism is more subtle. Women are judged harshly on the basis of what they wear, the tone of their voice, and the words they use. And they are judged on these things in ways that men are not. That's the subtle sexism of today.



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Reply #31 on: February 11, 2016, 10:59:07 PM
In our real world, you can no longer get away with cat calls (wolf whistles if you want to avoid cat puns) or hitting on your subordinates, so sexism is more subtle.

These things still happen (though I think they're less widely acceptable).



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Reply #32 on: February 12, 2016, 12:32:43 AM
Quote
The main reason I think this is because the sexism was too blatant. In our real world, you can no longer get away with cat calls (wolf whistles if you want to avoid cat puns) or hitting on your subordinates, so sexism is more subtle. Women are judged harshly on the basis of what they wear, the tone of their voice, and the words they use. And they are judged on these things in ways that men are not. That's the subtle sexism of today.

It's actually both/and. Street harassment, I'm sad to say, is alive and well. So is workplace sexual harassment, both direct and indirect (although it varies by industry and workplace). I'm a little surprised to hear anyone suggest otherwise, but I understand these things are often invisible to male-presenting people, as catcallers and sexual harassers almost universally save their behavior for when women are alone, or only with other women.

Hell, just today a friend of mine went for a run, and some strange dude decided to join her, harassing her and keeping up creep-banter for literal miles. That ain't subtle harassment by any standard, and that's in full daylight in a suburban neighborhood in the middle of the day.

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CryptoMe

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Reply #33 on: February 15, 2016, 04:06:29 PM
Hell, just today a friend of mine went for a run, and some strange dude decided to join her, harassing her and keeping up creep-banter for literal miles. That ain't subtle harassment by any standard, and that's in full daylight in a suburban neighborhood in the middle of the day.

No, that is not subtle at all!!
I guess it must be regional. I have noticed a decided improvement over the years where I live (Toronto). Not just in behaviour, but in everyone's attitude. The average man here no longer considers this kind of behaviour acceptable at all. So it's getting better. That said, most men won't even admit that the subtle forms of sexism exist or are a real problem. So, still more work to do.