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Author Topic: Revision Process  (Read 2519 times)
Kabal
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Posts: 166



« on: May 15, 2015, 03:47:36 PM »

Do you have a process or checklist? I know every story is different and requires a different approach just wondering if anyone has basic guidelines they use as a toolset?
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SpareInch
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Posts: 1304


Will there be sugar after the rebellion?


« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2015, 04:50:34 AM »

I usually produce a first draft from an original idea and outline document. Then I read it through as critically as I can, which is always harder with your own work, and make any changes I think I need. Rinse and repeat...

For preference, I like to leave each draft for at least a couple of days before revision, to give myself a little distance from the work, but sometimes I'm just too excited by the story. Anyway, the first revision always turns up a load of obvious problems, even when I leap straight into it.

One of the things that always need attention when I do that first edit is to cut out duplicated story elements, usually background info. I have a tendency to put the same facts in two or three times, then decide where it works best during the revision process.

Once I have something that I think reads nicely and pulls its weight as a story, I submit it for critique...

And that's when I find out all the problems I missed. Many of which seem embarrassingly obvious once someone points them out. Sad

After that, I consider all the critique comments and suggestions and try to rewrite the story again with those in mind. Of course, you should never just use critique as a set of instructions for how to redraft a story, so not all of them get any attention paid in the new version, but having asked for opinions, It's always worth having a good hard think about which ones you're going to make use of, if any.

After that, I do the read through and revise thing again.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2015, 04:55:28 AM by SpareInch » Logged

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SpareInch
Hipparch
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Posts: 1304


Will there be sugar after the rebellion?


« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2015, 05:10:34 AM »

Another good revision tool is to read your story aloud, preferably to someone else. Or better still, get them to read it to you. The ersatz version of this is to turn your story into a spoken audio track, which is a function I think all computer operating systems have these days. Being blind, I have no choice but to use a speech engine to access my computer anyway, but it's still surprising how many mistakes, errors, and badly constructed sentences I find with that speech engine.

Using a full blown screen reader, like Apple VoiceOver, is even more flexible, as it lets you listen to individual paragraphs or sentences without filling your hard disc with MP3 files. On the other hand, they are usually designed to work with a keyboard interface rather than your mouse.
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dagny
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Posts: 718



« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2015, 12:51:45 PM »

I don't have any particular checklist, but I do tend to try to have other people read the story right away so that they can give me feedback on specific plot points--what works, what doesn't, etc.

I reread my work over and over, making little changes every time. I usually work in Google Docs and keep a copy saved, too, so I can go back and compare. Usually I try to reread my work at least once a week.

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"Wolfman's got nards!"
iainmclaughlin
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Posts: 1


« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2015, 05:49:35 PM »

For me it varies. I've been writing for 30 years so I have a load of ideas sitting in folders waiting their turn. When I have the idea I write it as the ideas come, in a loose form and then tidy plot, charcaterisation and so on. When I come to look at it seriously I'll break it down to acts/chapters/episodes. I plucked a couple of novellas this year from stuff I had sitting in the folder. When I'm asked to pitch for a particular series  or range I work it out longhand on paper then type that up as a second draft and pop it off to the editor or producer. When I'm writing radio or audio I always do a reading out loud to make sure the timing is right. If it's something that's heavy on sound effects it can be a bit of a best estimate but reading out loud is a good tool to use. It was actually written into a couple of my Bog Finish contracts that we had to do these readings for timing. I'm fortunate to have a lot of friends who also write professionally and we talk to each other and send stories back and forth for sense checks and opinions. A second pair of eyes on a story is always a good thing.
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Witchlander
Peltast
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Posts: 137



« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2015, 07:35:26 PM »

For me, time between drafts is very important. I need to take a little vacation from the work before coming back to it. This helps in two ways. First, I'm no longer so attached to my "darlings" and they're now easier to kill. Second, I can see the piece as a whole again, whereas when I just dive in and start revising right away, I find I can't see the forest for the trees.

I've found revising much easier now that I use Scrivener--just one file as opposed to a dozen different versions of the work.
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Alen91kane
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Posts: 2


« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2017, 06:26:08 AM »

Hey Every one,

Thanks for sharing your Point of view about " Revision Checklist " Only one Post which I like the most which is given by " SpareInch " So Thanks a lot for sharing these wonderful Tips and Experience. Well I think there is no checklist works for my Revision. I believe in Practice and Practicals So Please Don't mind. But I really appreciate your Work.

Thanks!!!!
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