Escape Artists
November 21, 2017, 04:09:17 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: The FINAL ROUND of the PseudoPod Flash Fiction Contest has begun!
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All
  Print  
Author Topic: What is your favorite YA book?  (Read 13045 times)
Not-a-Robot
Hipparch
******
Posts: 995


Now 100% biological and 3 x more optimism!


« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2016, 04:34:07 PM »

Momo or the Strange Story of the Time Thieves and of the Child That Returned the People's Stolen Time by Micheal Ende (normally just called Momo) is more of a children's novel, but it's great for all ages.  Unfortunately, it's very hard to find a translation...
« Last Edit: January 31, 2016, 04:38:23 PM by Not-a-Robot » Logged
BraxLimbo
Palmer
**
Posts: 23


« Reply #21 on: February 02, 2016, 03:24:10 AM »

The Selection series by Keira Cass - i've been hooked
and is Rick Riordan's books considered as YA?? LOL I think they're more into fantasy tho
Logged
Fenrix
Curmudgeonly Co-Editor of PseudoPod
Editor
*****
Posts: 3605


Have you found the Yellow Sign?


« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2016, 11:36:25 PM »

How could I forget?

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
The Restaurant at the End of the Universe
Life, the Universe, and Everything

I would stop at these three for YA. I actually went out of my way to find a collection for my niece that only included the first three books. So Long and Thanks for All the Fish is better appreciated as a mid-life existential crisis, and not as a teen. Hated it back in the day. Really appreciate it as an adult. The fifth book just makes me grumpy.
Logged

I always lock the door when I creep by daylight.
SpareInch
Hipparch
******
Posts: 1363


Will there be sugar after the rebellion?


« Reply #23 on: February 08, 2016, 02:13:06 PM »

I have never really had a solid grip on what is or is not YA, But some time in the latter half of the 80s, probably after pulling the, "I don't want to be entertained! I'm BORED!" thing once too often, I was marched into a book store and ordered to buy something. The assistant produced 2 paperbacks. One had cover art showing jeeps and helicopters and burning buildings, and whatever it was called, it didn't appeal. The other one had an awe inspiring picture of an aircraft flying over a rocky monochrome desert, and looked so delightfully desolate, I bought it first and read the title later.

For those who don't have an encyclopaedic knowledge of cover art, it was Cloud Warrior, the first volume of Patrick Tilley's Amtrak Wars series. And I saved up to buy all the other books, including the separate volume glossary. (Yes, you had a special dictionary to help keep track of everything.) That series was the story that let me know that there was a reason to read novels that went beyond writing an essay to prove you've read it. (I'm still sore about the poor grade I got for my analysis of the character and motivations of Atticus in To Kill A Mocking Bird.)

Later, I read a book belonging to my mother called Emergence, by, if I remember rightly, David R Palmer. That was a great book about a 12 year old girl and her faithful pet macaw who survive the apocalypse, only to discover that the girl is not a Homo Sapiens after all, but a member of a new species, the next evolution of man. She sets off alone, apart from the bird, to find the rest of her race and ends up crossing the US, going into orbit, and almost killing herself several times along the way.

It was full of developing self confidence, solving problems, first love, being taken seriously by real live adults, and all those other classic YA coming of age themes. I read it several times in my teens and early 20s.

Oh, and let's not forget A Hat Full Of Sky Cheesy

BTW. Before I went blind, I really did buy books and records just because I liked the cover art. And I was rarely disappointed. Just goes to show, you can judge a book by its cover. But only if you're awesome. Tongue
Logged

Fresh slush - Shot this morning in the Vale of COW
Not-a-Robot
Hipparch
******
Posts: 995


Now 100% biological and 3 x more optimism!


« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2016, 02:22:51 PM »

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the obvious Watership Down.

What's with that?  It's not my favorite book, but if you haven't read it, it's well worth a read.
Logged
Fenrix
Curmudgeonly Co-Editor of PseudoPod
Editor
*****
Posts: 3605


Have you found the Yellow Sign?


« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2016, 04:20:13 PM »

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the obvious Watership Down.

What's with that?  It's not my favorite book, but if you haven't read it, it's well worth a read.

Is Watership Down YA? Never would have occurred to me. See, I told you my meter is not calibrated. Granted, most of my impression is from the deeply traumatizing cartoon, but I'm confident I read this back in somewhere in either 8th or 9th grade. So I guess that's YA? Then again, that's about when I started reading horror.

Which then leads to: Is Stephen King YA? A compelling argument could be made for things like Carrie and Firestarter.
Logged

I always lock the door when I creep by daylight.
lowky
Hipparch
******
Posts: 2692


from http://lovecraftismissing.com/?page_id=3142


« Reply #26 on: February 09, 2016, 12:06:03 AM »

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the obvious Watership Down.

What's with that?  It's not my favorite book, but if you haven't read it, it's well worth a read.

Is Watership Down YA? Never would have occurred to me. See, I told you my meter is not calibrated. Granted, most of my impression is from the deeply traumatizing cartoon, but I'm confident I read this back in somewhere in either 8th or 9th grade. So I guess that's YA? Then again, that's about when I started reading horror.

Which then leads to: Is Stephen King YA? A compelling argument could be made for things like Carrie and Firestarter.
Not just Carrie and Firestarter, but also The Shining (remember Danny is the main character), The Talisman, Eyes of the Dragon (written specifically as a children's story for his kids), Cycle of the Werewolf, the Dark Tower series, and most of his other stories all center around kids/teens as the central characters, at least for part of the story. 
Logged

Not-a-Robot
Hipparch
******
Posts: 995


Now 100% biological and 3 x more optimism!


« Reply #27 on: February 09, 2016, 07:42:34 AM »

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the obvious Watership Down.

What's with that?  It's not my favorite book, but if you haven't read it, it's well worth a read.

Is Watership Down YA? Never would have occurred to me. See, I told you my meter is not calibrated. Granted, most of my impression is from the deeply traumatizing cartoon, but I'm confident I read this back in somewhere in either 8th or 9th grade. So I guess that's YA? Then again, that's about when I started reading horror.

Which then leads to: Is Stephen King YA? A compelling argument could be made for things like Carrie and Firestarter.

I am not sure if Watership Down is YA, but I heard an interview with Richard Adams, and it is a story that he made for his daughters (children at the time).  It was rejected 15 or 16 time because publishing houses couldn't identify a target audience.  They said it was about bunnies, so it was obviously a children's book, but the content was geared towards teenagers and older, and anyone older than a child would never read a book about bunnies...

So, Richard Adam's original intent for the text was for younger audiences (his daughters), and he never intended to sell it.  He just wanted to get it published to give copies to his daughters.  But people of all ages bought and read the book.

This is what makes YA so hard to distinguish.

Another example is Micheal Ende (author of The Never Ending Story).  He never intended to write children's books.  His original hit Jim Knopf und Lukas der Lokomativführer was book that he wrote for himself.  It can be interpreted as a satire of his elementary education during Nazi times in Germany.  He picked a black lead character (one of the few in German literature in the 1960s) and wrote a whimsical fantasy adventure.  It ended up being a children's book and he unintentionally became a children's author.  He regretted being called a children's author and said that his books were intended for everyone.

So the line is very blurry.  

Logged
danooli
Moderator
*****
Posts: 1416



WWW
« Reply #28 on: February 09, 2016, 08:38:39 AM »

YA fiction is not an easily defined genre.

In my opinion, the themes, actions and experiences in the story are far more important a benchmark though than whether or not the main characters are young people. We actually have a story coming up where all of the characters are elderly, but, it still works for a YA audience.
Logged
Fenrix
Curmudgeonly Co-Editor of PseudoPod
Editor
*****
Posts: 3605


Have you found the Yellow Sign?


« Reply #29 on: February 09, 2016, 12:21:14 PM »


Which then leads to: Is Stephen King YA? A compelling argument could be made for things like Carrie and Firestarter.


Not just Carrie and Firestarter, but also The Shining (remember Danny is the main character), The Talisman, Eyes of the Dragon (written specifically as a children's story for his kids), Cycle of the Werewolf, the Dark Tower series, and most of his other stories all center around kids/teens as the central characters, at least for part of the story. 


I'll grant you everything but the Shining. Sure, Danny's the protagonist, but thematically it swirls around Jack's anger, alcoholism, and inadequacies. My memory recalls Danny as being pretty passive, which is also a strike against it thematically as YA.

IT might be a better consideration thematically as it's about loss of innocence and the transition from youth and wonder to adulthood and banality.


YA fiction is not an easily defined genre.

In my opinion, the themes, actions and experiences in the story are far more important a benchmark though than whether or not the main characters are young people.
 

So, expanding on this, could you help me out and use something that is pretty universally considered YA (say, Harry Potter) and point out the key bullet points why? Then maybe a counter example of something that is considered YA but isn't? If you forced me to, I could answer the first but not the second.

Logged

I always lock the door when I creep by daylight.
danooli
Moderator
*****
Posts: 1416



WWW
« Reply #30 on: February 09, 2016, 01:07:43 PM »



YA fiction is not an easily defined genre.

In my opinion, the themes, actions and experiences in the story are far more important a benchmark though than whether or not the main characters are young people.
 

So, expanding on this, could you help me out and use something that is pretty universally considered YA (say, Harry Potter) and point out the key bullet points why? Then maybe a counter example of something that is considered YA but isn't? If you forced me to, I could answer the first but not the second.

Again, these are my opinions, but I tend to view themes like the obvious coming-of-age, defining one's identity, path of learning, team building and the beginning of experimentation (including sexuality and drugs) as YA type themes.

In thinking about how to answer this question, I realize that a lot of the themes are common between YA and "adult" literature. Themes like death, addiction, bullying, friendship...all of these are prevalent in both, but I suppose it's the way each is dealt with that will land a piece on either side of this blurry divide.

I am trying now to think of an example for your second point. I think Lev Grossman's The Magicians may qualify. It's a story about a magic school, but there are some very dark elements.  Most of the characters are extremely flawed and experience some horrific things. That in and of itself doesn't make it not YA, but there is a level of cynicism that, to me, pushes it to an older audience. 

Maybe that's it. For me, if there is an "innocence" can be maintained through the end of the story, that is YA. I don't mean that characters can't grow, just not become too cynical.

I'm rambling, and will likely revisit this soon.
Logged
Witchlander
Peltast
***
Posts: 137



« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2016, 07:22:42 PM »



So, expanding on this, could you help me out and use something that is pretty universally considered YA (say, Harry Potter) and point out the key bullet points why? Then maybe a counter example of something that is considered YA but isn't? If you forced me to, I could answer the first but not the second.


I've always seen Harry Potter put in the middle-grade category, actually. It's higher middle grade and Harry does get older, but when it came out the marketing category was pretty firmly MG.

I can't remember what YA author said she likes to write YA because it is about "firsts"--first love, first sex, first experience with death etc. I think it may have been Laurie Halse Anderson.

The YA editor Hadley Dyer said at a conference I attended that if Catcher in the Rye came out today, it would be marketed as YA and no one would blink an eye.

I actually read a book recently that is being marketed as YA and has no young adults in it! That was a first for me. It was Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick. It's a pretty weird and wonderful book about vampires and reincarnation and fairy tales that takes place in many different time periods. I think it's being marketed as YA because Sedgwick is a YA author and that's where his fan base is. If a writer for adults wrote this book it would never be called YA.  Odd.


Logged
Not-a-Robot
Hipparch
******
Posts: 995


Now 100% biological and 3 x more optimism!


« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2016, 03:22:28 AM »


I can't remember what YA author said she likes to write YA because it is about "firsts"--first love, first sex, first experience with death etc.

What about a book like The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls?  I know it's not speculative (but it's certainly weird), and it may not even be fiction (officially it's a memoir), but it is loaded with firsts. I don't know if it's too raw for YA. 

Opinions from those that have read it...   
Logged
Anthony Creamer (Poisonwaters)
Matross
****
Posts: 211


« Reply #33 on: February 16, 2016, 01:11:56 AM »

Podkayne of Mars by Heinlein

I think I've read more Y/A books post 30 than pre 20. Smiley
Logged
Devoted135
Hipparch
******
Posts: 1252



« Reply #34 on: February 21, 2016, 10:11:10 PM »

Has anyone mentioned the Redwall series by Brian Jacques? Man, I love those books... I really enjoy the Castaways of the Flying Dutchman books as well.
Logged
Anthony Creamer (Poisonwaters)
Matross
****
Posts: 211


« Reply #35 on: February 22, 2016, 12:05:15 AM »

Those redwall books were great books. Still are, I have them all on audio book I think I just listened to them last year.
Logged
stePH
Actually has enough cowbell.
Hipparch
******
Posts: 3905


Cool story, bro!


WWW
« Reply #36 on: February 29, 2016, 06:13:03 PM »

I haven't read any Redwall, but I enjoy this track by Kabuto the Python:

Kabuto the Python
"Verdauga Greeneyes"
The Almighty (2013)


And if it's a series about warrior cats, I'm finna look into it. For the same reason, I'm interested in the Warriors series.

(Verse 1 - Verdauga)
British motherfuckers bound to shout "the guy's barmey"
while I chill in Kotir with the Thousand Eye Army
Proudly I, couched with 5,000 fly mamis
tout divine powers, live rowdy, die calmly
Sigil flap stiched to my flags atop towers
Dynasty the peak of the cats in Mossflower
Burning oil plotting strategics at odd hours
with the otter clans trading me weapons for raw powder
Zweihander strapped to the flank, collecting tax for the ranks
I got some rats with some shanks that need to eat, kid
Listen, bastard I ain't, protect your asses
Give thanks that for a cat I'm a saint, we in agreement
A. I run my fortress with ease, I run the forest and trees, I thunder forcibly
B. You men are mice, though
I used to bump AOTP, I'm kinda playing
their beat and writing graciously
Steez is hella maestro

(Chorus)
And y'all rats, kid (rats, kid)
All up in my bubble talking that shit (that shit)
I knew that you were trouble but this cat kid (cat kid)
is a motherfucker you don't scrap with, motherfucker
Motherfucker it's Verdauga, the Lord of Kotir as I command it
It's Verdauga (the green-eyed bandit, can't stand it)
It's Verdauga with the Thousand Eye Army, god damn it,
It's Verdauga


(Verse 2 - Martin)
This shit is half fanfiction, other half grand diction
Wandering far from my home and clan, miss them
And remembering the smell of a rose is damn sickening
Ambushed, to the hilt of the blade my hand quickens
The Thousand Eyes glimmer twixt trees from all around me, surround me
Dope but outmatched, I'm beaten soundly
Verdauga Greeneyes decries and treats me lousy
I'm on it though, link with C.O.R.I.M. and meet the mousethief
'Scape into the forest, skip the gate and we run
Meet the skipper in alliance with some atheist nuns
and deep in Brockhall, the critters all are majorly bummed
It seems the coup of Tsarmina means the capers is done
But I ain't playing for fun, the name is Martin, son of Luke the legend
We can talk about your fucking vittles and your soup in heaven
Dip to Badger Mountain, I ain't tryna hear your stupid reverend
Re-forge my sword with a star that fell, a super weapon

(Chorus)

(Verse 3 - Bane)
Scimitar, scabbard and mind to use it promptly
In it for the cash and dash, finna be gone, see,
and pay a couple rabbity sops to do my laundry
with ale in my chalice and sipping beneath a palm tree
My men are threescore strong
with a couple dozen oak strongboxes in which we store arms
Known to Verdauga, now we fight for his daughter
because the cat done made a generous offer
The name is Bane and I march with my sixty-odd weasels on the woods
Doing evil for the good of my people with the goods
Verdauga would've won it, but his seed they never could
hence, deceit is what I would--less a eagle get my hood
Told her that I'm down for the cause, but i'm lying
Backstabber, strike with the speed of the sky's lighting
Fighter, I do it for me or I die trying
Damned to die proud, die free, die flying

(Chorus)

Thousand Eyes, march
« Last Edit: February 29, 2016, 06:14:59 PM by stePH » Logged

"Nerdcore is like playing Halo while getting a blow-job from Hello Kitty."
-- some guy interviewed in Nerdcore Rising
Devoted135
Hipparch
******
Posts: 1252



« Reply #37 on: February 29, 2016, 10:43:09 PM »

There are definitely warrior cats, though they appear infrequently. Basically, the good guys are mice, otters, moles, badgers, hares, squirrels, etc. Some are peaceful while others are war-like, but all will step up and fight if necessary. The bad guys are rats, foxes, weasels, etc and are typically in roving war-like bands that want to take over Redwall Abbey and live the good life. Each book will take you about a day (or less) to read. PLEASE read at least the first 6-7 in order of publication, and forgive Redwall for a couple literary missteps that were corrected by the time he wrote Mossflower. Sorry, I'm a little obsessed. Roll Eyes
Logged
stePH
Actually has enough cowbell.
Hipparch
******
Posts: 3905


Cool story, bro!


WWW
« Reply #38 on: March 01, 2016, 01:43:57 PM »

Thanks for the tip; I'll see if my library has ebook versions; failing that I'll get 'em on paper.

How about that hip-hop track? I'm not familiar with the series so I don't know the characters - now that you bring it up, I don't even know if Martin and Bane are cats or not.
But the track's still a banger  Cool
Logged

"Nerdcore is like playing Halo while getting a blow-job from Hello Kitty."
-- some guy interviewed in Nerdcore Rising
Devoted135
Hipparch
******
Posts: 1252



« Reply #39 on: March 03, 2016, 03:01:12 PM »

The Martin verse is pretty spot on, so I am guessing the other two are as well. It's harder to remember the villains' individual names. So Bane may be a cat? But Martin the Warrior is THE Mouse, the most heroic of mice. Smiley
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3  All
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!