Author Topic: What are you reading?  (Read 790298 times)

stePH

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Reply #2350 on: October 23, 2013, 05:37:03 PM
Now checking out Kip Manley's City of Roses, as I am a P-town resident. I copied and pasted text from his site into MS Werd, the first three "chapbooks" worth, and saved as .pdf so I can read on Barnabas, and if I like it I'll go to Smashwords or wherever and buy it.

...while I'm on the subject - Portlandia is not a sketch comedy show; it is a documentary.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2013, 04:49:51 AM by stePH »

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lowky

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Reply #2351 on: October 24, 2013, 04:41:49 AM
Ship of Magic by Robin Hobb


Procyon

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Reply #2352 on: October 25, 2013, 01:13:13 AM
I, too, am reading King's The Shining, which so far is great.  Seems like a good time of year for this story.  I loved It, but this feels much less epic in scope, more psychological, more claustrophobic.

Also of note: I'm reading this on an ipad.  The waiting list for this book at the library was too long (witching season would be long past), so I spent the $4 to buy it from the ibookstore.  First time I've read a book of this length entirely on a tablet screen.  Pretty good experience, actually!  I thought I'd have more complaints, but I don't.  Maybe this is a new era of me starting to go deep into electronic books.



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Reply #2353 on: October 25, 2013, 01:20:26 AM
I'm listening to The Shining, which I've never read/watched/listened to before. I can completely understand why it's an iconic horror story.
I'm fascinated by the idea of this book in audio form.  So much of this book is about people's inner monologues, flashes of thoughts you want to suppress, mind reading and mental intrusion, hallucinations, etc.  Stephen King uses a peculiar, but effective, orthographic system of parentheses, italics, capitalization, and punctuation to denote subtle differences in what people are thinking and perceiving.  I have to ask this: does it work in audio format?  I imagine the expressiveness of the human voice is up to the challenge, but a tough challenge it would be. 



bounceswoosh

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Reply #2354 on: October 25, 2013, 02:14:34 AM
I just finished the Robin Hobb Liveship Traders trilogy. I'm now reading Full Catastrophe living, which is about using meditation and mindfulness to deal with, well,heavy stuff. I got a copy for a family member who is living with chronic back pain; I figured if I were going to gift it, I should also read it myself.



bounceswoosh

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Reply #2355 on: October 25, 2013, 02:32:31 AM
Are any of you on goodreads? You can find me by searching bounceswoosh and goodreads together on google.



DKT

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Reply #2356 on: October 25, 2013, 05:20:45 AM
I'm listening to The Shining, which I've never read/watched/listened to before. I can completely understand why it's an iconic horror story.
I'm fascinated by the idea of this book in audio form.  So much of this book is about people's inner monologues, flashes of thoughts you want to suppress, mind reading and mental intrusion, hallucinations, etc.  Stephen King uses a peculiar, but effective, orthographic system of parentheses, italics, capitalization, and punctuation to denote subtle differences in what people are thinking and perceiving.  I have to ask this: does it work in audio format?  I imagine the expressiveness of the human voice is up to the challenge, but a tough challenge it would be. 

I know exactly what you mean. A friend of mine at work mentioned this when I told him I was listening to it. The reader is Campbell Scott, who is a pretty good actor, and he does an excellent job His voice and reading style pretty perfectly match the minimalistic set-up. And he handles the ellipses with subtle but clear tone shifts to his voice. It was pretty chilling, really - particularly where Jack Torrance is concerned.

Will Patton reads Doctor Sleep, and employed a very similar technique (I'm pretty sure there are a decent number of ellipses in Doctor Sleep too).

All in all, both incredibly good listens :)


suzume234

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Reply #2357 on: October 25, 2013, 01:28:10 PM
I'm listening to The Shining, which I've never read/watched/listened to before. I can completely understand why it's an iconic horror story.

I watched a documentary on Netflix about The Shining (movie of course).  Now I can't wait to read the book and compare it with the movie.



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Reply #2358 on: October 25, 2013, 01:36:39 PM
I am currently reading The New Weird, edited by Ann and Jeff Vandermeer.  I am quite sad to say that I'm almost halfway through.  Some of these stories are quite disturbing: The Neglected Garden, by Kathe Koja comes to mind.  Others don't have as much of a plot, and are more an example of what happens in a strange town. 

I don't really want the Weird to stop, does anyone have any suggestions, what to read next?



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Reply #2359 on: October 25, 2013, 03:54:26 PM
I'm listening to The Shining, which I've never read/watched/listened to before. I can completely understand why it's an iconic horror story.

I watched a documentary on Netflix about The Shining (movie of course).  Now I can't wait to read the book and compare it with the movie.

Was that Room 237? I was reading about that the other day on Grady Hendrix's Stephen King series (which is seriously excellent in and of itself). It's one more thing I want to watch (probably after I watch the movie).

I am currently reading The New Weird, edited by Ann and Jeff Vandermeer.  I am quite sad to say that I'm almost halfway through.  Some of these stories are quite disturbing: The Neglected Garden, by Kathe Koja comes to mind.  Others don't have as much of a plot, and are more an example of what happens in a strange town. 

I don't really want the Weird to stop, does anyone have any suggestions, what to read next?

I haven't read all that yet, but I really want to. Sigh.

But there's all kinds of weird stuff around - Jeff VanderMeer's own books are pretty weird, and some of China Mieville's stuff too. Koja had a novel published by Small Beer Press called Under the Poppy. I haven't read it myself, but have heard several people recommend it. 

Oh! And Kelly Link's short stories are some of the weirdest, loveliest things I've read.


suzume234

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Reply #2360 on: October 28, 2013, 04:15:25 PM
I'm listening to The Shining, which I've never read/watched/listened to before. I can completely understand why it's an iconic horror story.

I watched a documentary on Netflix about The Shining (movie of course).  Now I can't wait to read the book and compare it with the movie.

Was that Room 237? I was reading about that the other day on Grady Hendrix's Stephen King series (which is seriously excellent in and of itself). It's one more thing I want to watch (probably after I watch the movie).

I am currently reading The New Weird, edited by Ann and Jeff Vandermeer.  I am quite sad to say that I'm almost halfway through.  Some of these stories are quite disturbing: The Neglected Garden, by Kathe Koja comes to mind.  Others don't have as much of a plot, and are more an example of what happens in a strange town. 

I don't really want the Weird to stop, does anyone have any suggestions, what to read next?

I haven't read all that yet, but I really want to. Sigh.

But there's all kinds of weird stuff around - Jeff VanderMeer's own books are pretty weird, and some of China Mieville's stuff too. Koja had a novel published by Small Beer Press called Under the Poppy. I haven't read it myself, but have heard several people recommend it. 

Oh! And Kelly Link's short stories are some of the weirdest, loveliest things I've read.


Sorry it's taken me so long to reply.  There was an error on Tapa talk.. so I can see the post but couldn't reply on my tablet.  Anyway...


That was a good article!  It was basically a summary of the documentary, yes it was Room 237, but I enjoyed the mention of the moveable set at the end of the article, how creepy to have a disembodied voice laugh at you while you're at work.  I'll have to look at the rest of his reviews. 

I think I enjoyed the first half of the book more than I am enjoying the second, but maybe I'm just becoming used to thinking in a strange manner, and the weird is becoming more expected?  I certainly hope not!  I love short stories though, and have enjoyed nearly every story.  I think I may read these stories again.  I might check out Kelly Link next.  I remember listening to her stories in podcasts and enjoying them. 

Thanks for all of your suggestions!



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Reply #2361 on: October 29, 2013, 04:37:58 PM
Just finished Doctor Sleep. It's actually really, really good. There's some minor issues I have with it, but generally speaking, it does so much right. Definitely recommended for King fans, and fans of The Shining (at least, the book).


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Reply #2362 on: October 29, 2013, 05:18:14 PM
About 80 pages into The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by NK Jemisin, and it's really starting to get good! Plus, I'm reading this awesome library paperback copy that has clearly been loved a LOT. It's like getting to both discover a new book and sit down with a comfortable old friend at the same time! ;D



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Reply #2363 on: October 29, 2013, 10:43:55 PM
About 2/3rds the way through A Dance with Dragons by George R.R. Martin. I now understand why everybody who read it before wasn't very happy with it. It is very enjoyable... but I think it's the weakest of all the books. I kind of feel like I'm getting all the filler that will be needed to understand the next book. Like I'm following all the "B" plots instead of the main story.

-Kat



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Reply #2364 on: October 31, 2013, 02:16:38 PM
Dipping into some unsettling horror/supernatural short fiction for this Halloween.  I try to savor the short stories I read -- too many too quickly and they can blur together or be forgotten entirely.  Here's what I've quaffed in the last few days:

  • "The Shunned House" by H. P. Lovecraft
  • "The Pale Criminal" by C. Hall Thompson
  • "The Horror at Red Hook" by H. P. Lovecraft
  • A Universal History of Iniquity by Jorge Luis Borges

All recommended, if you like that sort of thing.  Anthologies are wonderful things, especially this time of year.



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Reply #2365 on: November 08, 2013, 05:23:57 PM
Holly Black's The Coldest Girl in Coldtown. It's a vampire YA book, but there are some pretty terrifying and disturbing things happening in it. I like good vampire stories, and I like this book. It's got atmosphere, angst, and vampires that can be sexy and monstrous (ditto the humans). The audiobook is really well done.


DKT

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Reply #2366 on: November 08, 2013, 05:35:00 PM
Also, between this book and the two Stephen Kings I listened to before it, I'm gonna have to read something full of sunshine to cheer me up.

I've been reading the House of Secrets by Chris Columbus (director of the first two Harry Potter movies and The Lightning Thief) and Ned Vizzini with my daughter. She found it at a bookstore and really enjoys it. She just finished reading the first Potter book, and I read her Kid Vs. Squid earlier this year. Those are probably the "scariest" things she's read up until this point. This is maybe for slightly older kids? But only slightly.

It's okay. It's enjoyable, but you also get the feeling that it's AS MUCH AWESOME STUFF AS I CAN CRAM INTO A BOOK AND FASTER RUN RUN RUN RUN HURRY!

My daughter likes FASTER RUN RUN RUN RUN HURRY! so she's fine with it, and I guess I am too. She's ripping through it when I'm not reading it to her, so I really can't complain.

Might try reading The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe with her, or A Wrinkle in Time, or The Lightning Thief (which she won at school), or even Troubletwisters (Nix and Williams). Really not sure.


Devoted135

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Reply #2367 on: November 11, 2013, 08:16:25 PM
About 80 pages into The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by NK Jemisin, and it's really starting to get good! Plus, I'm reading this awesome library paperback copy that has clearly been loved a LOT. It's like getting to both discover a new book and sit down with a comfortable old friend at the same time! ;D

LOVED this book! One of the best, and most unique fantasy stories I've read in quite a while. :)



jrderego

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Reply #2368 on: November 12, 2013, 03:38:42 AM
The Man in the High Castle - P.K. Dick

"Happiness consists of getting enough sleep." Robert A. Heinlein
Also, please buy my book - Escape Clause: A Union Dues Novel
http://www.encpress.com/EC.html


lowky

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Reply #2369 on: November 12, 2013, 01:25:22 PM
Just finished The Kill Room by Jeffrey Deaver and started on Mad Ship #2 in Robin Hobb's Liveship Traders series.


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Reply #2370 on: November 12, 2013, 06:58:04 PM
Jacqueline Carey -- Kushiel's Dart

Next up: Terry Pratchett -- Raising Steam

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Devoted135

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Reply #2371 on: November 12, 2013, 10:33:51 PM
Just started The Songs of Distant Earth by Arthur C Clarke (the novel, not the short story that also appears to exist). My kindle version included a really interesting author's note that commented on how he didn't consider much popular science fiction at the time (mid-eighties) to actually qualify as science fiction. He argued that since modern science has all but ruled out FTL-type technology, hard SF authors should not include such elements and that this novel was his "attempt to create a wholly realistic piece of fiction on the interstellar theme."



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Reply #2372 on: November 15, 2013, 07:08:01 PM
I read Ancilliary Justice by Ann Leckie, on the basis of the recommendations here at the Pods.  It was awesome stuff.  If that does not get on the Tiptree shortlist, I'll be astounded.

Hmm


Jompier

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Reply #2373 on: November 16, 2013, 01:29:14 AM
Just started The Songs of Distant Earth by Arthur C Clarke (the novel, not the short story that also appears to exist). My kindle version included a really interesting author's note that commented on how he didn't consider much popular science fiction at the time (mid-eighties) to actually qualify as science fiction. He argued that since modern science has all but ruled out FTL-type technology, hard SF authors should not include such elements and that this novel was his "attempt to create a wholly realistic piece of fiction on the interstellar theme."

Clarke is one of my favorites. I had always dabbled a bit in SF before, but it wasn't until I read Rendezvous with Rama that I really became hooked.

I'm just about finished reading Pohl's The Day the Martians Came. It's an interesting concept (how the arrival of Martians on Earth change our lives and motives here on Earth) but the vignettes vary pretty wildly in terms of my interest.



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Reply #2374 on: November 19, 2013, 11:39:59 AM
I finished Scott Lynch's Republic of Thieves last week (after re-reading The Lies of Locke Lamora and Red Seas Under Red Skies in the previous weeks) and I am still in love with Lynch's writing. I liked Republic of Thieves a bit less than the others, due to the whole "Locke's real origin", but still, immense fun.

Right now I'm reading non-fiction, for once - Monty Python Speaks, a series of interviews with the Pythons and associated folk.