Author Topic: PC062: The Fiddler of Bayou Teche  (Read 13840 times)

MacArthurBug

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Reply #25 on: July 30, 2009, 10:07:41 PM
man this was GOOD. I've been denied my interwebs for a bit during the move. Get online and THIS was my choice of things to start with. Good. one of my new favorites. I agree- nice "vocie" the story the MC the whole thing. Amazingly puttogether, well read, well timed. YAY!

Oh, great and mighty Alasdair, Orator Maleficent, He of the Silvered Tongue, guide this humble fangirl past jumping up and down and squeeing upon hearing the greatness of Thy voice.
Oh mighty Mur the Magnificent. I am not worthy.


gregbillock

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Reply #26 on: August 04, 2009, 07:18:12 AM
Fantastic story, and truly masterful reading.

I interpreted the fiddler's name as a dialect rendition of "Mr Dress Petipas" where "Mr" when spoken is pronounced "murr" but I see I must have been mistaken.




thomasowenm

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Reply #27 on: August 04, 2009, 08:05:32 PM
Excellent story, I was completly taken down to the bayou. This was escapist perfection, it picked me up and dropped me right in the heart of cajun country. 

Well read and voiced.  I give it an A-  because of the trouble with my understanding of the names which I had a lot of trouble making out.



LaShawn

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Reply #28 on: September 03, 2009, 02:47:20 PM
This is the type of story that makes a writer like me despair. The story was wonderful, and Musselman's reading of it was just the right amount of lyrical huskiness that immediately drew me in. I loved the detail of the Bayou, and the colloquial language, how she kept referring to herself when she talked:  "I didn't like it, me." Sheer brilliance. I also did catch the Red Shoes motif thrown into the mix. All in all, a wonderful story that I'd have to listen to again and again.

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Swamp

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Reply #29 on: September 23, 2009, 09:19:11 PM
I liked this story, me.  Absolutely wonderful story, so full of place.  Character was not forgotten, though.  As everyone else said, the reading made it perfect.  Although I missed some of the backstory at the beginning (need to go back and relisten), I liked how it all came around at the end that she became more connected to her roots.  The description of the dancing with each brother and their attempts to trip her up were very well done.  All in all, I was very pleased by this story.

Now don't go fiddle yourself down to Hell like ol' Boudrouex, eh.

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lunastrixae

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Reply #30 on: September 25, 2009, 07:53:58 PM
I've listened to this 3 or 4 times now, and I am NOT usually a re-reader of tales.

This is an entrancing story. Like many fables, it not too hard to imagine that this could have somehow, really happened. Or, perhaps part of the tale really did happen and the details became exaggerated over time.

As someone who spins yarn on a spinning wheel, I have to admit I liked the weaving and spinning of homespun cotton in the story.



Sleestaxx

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Reply #31 on: December 09, 2009, 10:32:24 PM
I have listened to this story 10 times and every time i mark it as new so that i can listen to it again. the reading was phenomenal and the story line fabulous. I began listening to Cajun music and researching Cajun lore.
 I found a couple adaptations of old fairy tales. Cinderella, red riding-hood, and the three pigs to name a few. this has to be the best story on podcastle hands down.

The Reverends Razor; "If you do not know where it is, then you do not know where it is not."


Unblinking

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Reply #32 on: December 21, 2009, 09:14:57 PM
This one was very cool!  I like a good "deal with the devil" tale and this was a good one with an unusual setting.  The Devil Went Down to Georgia is one of my old favorites, and I did also think of the red shoes.  I love Cajun accents, though I've never actually met anyone who speaks with one (I live up in the frozen norther, ya, you betcha).  Lots of great description, great reading, great plot, great characters.

I did have a little trouble trying to keep track of the names, probably because I mostly remember names by knowing how they're spelled, and French pronunciation is so strange to me that hearing a name gives me very little idea how it's spelled.  And in a few places it seemed like some details were based on southern myths that I'm completely unfamiliar with which made me feel a little left behind, if only for a moment.  But those are just minor things that didn't distract much from the story.

Good stuff!

On a tangent, I've now listened to all of Podcastle's backlogs, but I'm behind on the commenting.  :)



Alcairha

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Reply #33 on: January 01, 2010, 03:49:42 PM
I agree with all that was said below - superb writing, wonderful engaging characters and one of the best narrators I have ever heard! I will certainly look for more stories from this author and from this reader.



Sleestaxx

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Reply #34 on: April 30, 2010, 12:40:45 PM
listened to this AGAIN and i have made CD copies for my family. this is absolutely my favoritest story eva!

The Reverends Razor; "If you do not know where it is, then you do not know where it is not."