Author Topic: Looking for Submissions!  (Read 4862 times)

BRR

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on: September 26, 2013, 08:01:12 PM
Hey everyone!  The Bare Root Review is looking for submissions for the Fall 2013 issue.  We'd be glad to look at any pieces you all have.

You may submit:

Flash Fiction - Up to 1000 words.
Fiction – Up to 3000 words.
Poetry – Up to three poems.
Creative Non-Fiction – Up to 3000 words.

If you're interested, please send your pieces to bareroot@smsu.edu.



DKT

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Reply #1 on: September 26, 2013, 08:39:55 PM
Do you have a website? And what kind of pay do you offer?


Scattercat

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Reply #2 on: September 27, 2013, 05:59:52 AM
You're a lot nicer than I am, DKT.  That's probably why you're a real editor.



DKT

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Reply #3 on: September 27, 2013, 08:33:07 PM
Sir, I am not a real editor, merely a fantastic one.


eytanz

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Reply #4 on: September 27, 2013, 09:01:02 PM
Since the original poster doesn't seem to be answering, the answer is - yes, they do have a website.

And they do not offer any pay.

Make of this information what you will.



Alasdair5000

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Reply #5 on: September 27, 2013, 09:22:25 PM
Also, should the original poster still be reading, two things; firstly, I'm fairly certain we don't have a problem with people trawling for writers on these boards but I may be off beam. Guys? Thoughts?

And secondly, a suggestion for next time whether it's for here or anywhere else;

-First off, introduce yourself. Are you an editor? A slush reader? You're directly asking people for their work and trust me everyone appreciates working directly to a name.

-Secondly, as everyone has already said, please put your website on something like this.

-Finally, as an optional one, if you don't pay that's fine, few people do. But please, please say that up front. And under no circumstances use the phrase 'paid in exposure' or any derivative of it. It's insulting to you and to your prospective writers.

But seriously, if you want to trawl for submissions, this is a good spot, lots of really talented writers on deck in these parts. Just, please take a couple of minutes to make sure the trawl post is watertight. It'll help us all.



Scattercat

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Reply #6 on: September 27, 2013, 10:02:58 PM
It's less the act of trawling for submissions in itself than it is the combination of the lack of information and the fact that the author didn't participate anywhere else in the forum before posting the ad (and apparently hasn't been back since).  The overall effect is "Hi!  I don't give a flying crap about any of you except insofar as you intend to give me free content!  Byyyyyyye!"



eytanz

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Reply #7 on: September 27, 2013, 10:51:40 PM
Speaking as a moderator, I have no problem with people posting calls for submissions, even if those people are not active members of the forums. However, there are predatory groups out there that make a profit of other people's works that they acquire under false pretenses. It is not always easy to separate these from genuine venues which may simply not be in a position to pay authors but are honest in their intentions and communications. If I (or one of the other moderators or editors) am not sure about a submission call, then it will be deleted. Therefore, it's in everyone's best interest to actually give us the crucial information - especially regarding pay rates and where exactly the writing will be published (online? print? is access to the material free or does it require payment)?

Otherwise, you may get deleted. Or at the very least you may get your thread hijacked by various moderators and editors discussing the etiquette of posting submission threads.



alwaysblack

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Reply #8 on: September 28, 2013, 10:12:59 AM
Actually,  reading this got me thinking. It's been  a long time since I looked into getting published and as I look around I see that things have changed a lot  recent years. Is there an idiots guide somewhere that discusses the various 'good' and 'bad' opportunities that are available in the digital publishing age?

"If I asked you where the hell we were," said Arthur weakly, "would I regret it?"


Scattercat

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Reply #9 on: September 30, 2013, 05:40:53 AM
It boils down to:

1) Are they paying you (fairly) for your work?

2) Does their website look better than something made by a five-year-old?

Duotrope and the Submissions Grinder are good resources for finding venues, and the submissions statistics can actually help you detect weird sites.



alwaysblack

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Reply #10 on: September 30, 2013, 01:21:50 PM
Well, I suppose "fairly" is a tough call and very much open to interpretation but that Submissions Grinder is awesome and exactly what I was looking for. Cheers for that!

"If I asked you where the hell we were," said Arthur weakly, "would I regret it?"


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Reply #11 on: October 10, 2013, 09:35:34 PM
Well, I suppose "fairly" is a tough call and very much open to interpretation but that Submissions Grinder is awesome and exactly what I was looking for. Cheers for that!

Woot!  (co-founder of the Submissions Grinder here)

"Fairly" is indeed a tough call, but one you have to make for yourself.  One nice thing about dealing with short fiction is that the submissions guidelines generally state the payment terms explicitly in a take-it-or-leave-it fashion.  If you have a problem with it, you can choose not to submit.  It's not that easy with novel submissions.

Otherwise, there are several factors you can look at.  None of these are hard and fast by any means, but are all factors.
1.  Longevity.  Obviously every market has to start from scratch sometime, so you shouldn't discount something just because it's new.  But also keep in mind that in this Internet age it is easy to get a website and to say you are an editor and to get some fiction to put there.  It's MUCH less easy to do this consistently over a long period of time.  Particularly true of podcasts, which is where the word "podfade" comes in.  It's a lot of work to put a quality magazine together, and doing it in audio adds another layer.
2.  Website quality.  If the website looks like something I slapped together in my junior high computer class in the mid-90s, consider whether you as a reader would want to go there to read rather than something that looks like it was professionally made.
3.  Public (and private) correspondence with the editor.  If the editor acts like a jerk, either in public or in private, consider whether you want to depend on that guy to work with your stories.  I have written off some markets because the editor was very caustic in a semi-private forum for no reasonable cause.  If you submit to Pedestal, you get spam as if you had subscribed for a newsletter advertising the editor's writing.  Another example is a couple years ago when I saw  dozen of genre magazines all pop up which had almost-identical submissions guidelines, including some identical verbiage here and there, but each had a different editor and different focus genre and none of them mentioned the other ones as being sister publications.  That smelled fishy, and I stayed away from it.
4.  The payment/contract details.  Pay rate is certainly a factor.  While I think that Highlights Magazine was great when I was a kid, and they pay well, they buy your copyright which means you don't own the rights to your own story every again.  I don't submit there.
5.  Award nominations/wins.  You should never use this as your only judgment of a magazine, but if it wins Hugos and Nebulas, then obviously a large chunk of fandom thinks their work is worthwhile.  Lack of awards doesn't mean anything, but presence of them does.
6.  Do you like what they publish.  If you hate reading everything they publish, then it's very likely they won't like what you write.
7.  Submission stats (as previously mentioned).
8.  Reputation--this might be hard to determine unless you're on a bunch of writing forums, but for instance, I've heard time and time again that Everyday Fiction is more worthy than their token pay rate might suggest--because they have a very large reader base.



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Reply #12 on: October 10, 2013, 09:36:02 PM
Also, should the original poster still be reading, two things; firstly, I'm fairly certain we don't have a problem with people trawling for writers on these boards but I may be off beam. Guys? Thoughts?

And secondly, a suggestion for next time whether it's for here or anywhere else;

-First off, introduce yourself. Are you an editor? A slush reader? You're directly asking people for their work and trust me everyone appreciates working directly to a name.

-Secondly, as everyone has already said, please put your website on something like this.

-Finally, as an optional one, if you don't pay that's fine, few people do. But please, please say that up front. And under no circumstances use the phrase 'paid in exposure' or any derivative of it. It's insulting to you and to your prospective writers.

But seriously, if you want to trawl for submissions, this is a good spot, lots of really talented writers on deck in these parts. Just, please take a couple of minutes to make sure the trawl post is watertight. It'll help us all.

All good points!