Author Topic: Stephen King's Cell  (Read 15115 times)

clichekiller

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on: April 25, 2007, 03:00:39 PM
Who else has read it and what do you think of it's premise? 

I love Stephen King's earlier works, tend to hate his more recent efforts, so I was pleasantly surprised when I read this book and tore through it.  As usually King makes use of a unique premise to create a post apocalyptic world and runs its survivors through the gauntlet.  Formulaic, maybe, but fun just the same. 



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Reply #1 on: April 25, 2007, 04:12:09 PM
I'm really looking forward to getting to this one because it does sound like good old-fashioned zombie fun.  King usually either works for me or he doesn't (I loved Carrie, the Stand, and the Gunslinger).  Anyway, I'm glad he decided to just have some fun for a change.  I bet writing this after finishing the Dark Tower was a lot of fun for him, too.


clichekiller

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Reply #2 on: April 25, 2007, 04:28:57 PM
I was a huge fan of the Darktower series, The Stand and It.  Cell, while not quite on the same epic scale, definitely reminded me of his younger days of writing. 



UKCodeMonkey

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Reply #3 on: June 06, 2007, 03:49:29 PM
I read Cell and found that this was the first book that I couldn't put down. I read it every night when I could and managed to finish it in a week. I loved the story. The only thing I didn't like was the open ending; I hate open endings, I much prefer closure. After Cell, I bought The Stand: The Complete and Uncut Edition. This I read a little slower as I already knew the story from watching the film years ago. Both books are worth reading, even if the stories are similar.

Next SK read: The Shining. :D



Alasdair5000

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Reply #4 on: June 11, 2007, 08:21:52 PM
I loved it.  I've always been a bit of a mark for stories that deal with what happens after the world ends (I'm one of the six people on the planet quite fond of Reign of Fire for example) and the way that's explored I actually found really touching.  There was this palpable sense of the old world being just in the past and this new, horrific environment being something intensely dangerous and utterly alien.  If the film's done right then it'll be phenomenally good.



jscorbett

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Reply #5 on: June 16, 2007, 07:25:38 PM
Before the Cell it had been a while since I read anything from Stephen King, and I'm glad I did.  I was astonished at all the carnage right in the first 100 or so pages.  I read this book faster than any other of Stephen King's.  I feel he has changed as an author.  And I like the change.  I also read Lisey's Story.  It was slower than the Cell, but just as enjoyable.



Russell Nash

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Reply #6 on: June 25, 2007, 10:27:51 AM
I'm about 10 chapters in right now.

This is a really different Steohen King for me.  I have always dreaded starting a new Stephen King, because of the set-up.  It's always 300 pages or so before it really gets moving.  This time  BAM!!! right out of the gate.  Just a little foreshadowing and then business woman with cell phone tries to kill ice cream guy.

Can't wait to read more.



Russell Nash

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Reply #7 on: July 05, 2007, 07:31:30 PM
Typical of King the ending was lacking.  He either went 30 pages to long or cut it 30 pages short.  I was really into it until the end and then I just screamed, "that sucked!!"



BSWeichsel

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Reply #8 on: July 05, 2007, 10:21:58 PM
I was excited to hear it was a movie until I heard that Eli Roth was doing it.

He won't do it justice. Or at least I don't except him to. I hope I'm DEAD wrong.

Since it began, who have you killed? You wouldn't be alive now if you hadn't killed somebody.


Russell Nash

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Reply #9 on: July 06, 2007, 07:17:32 AM
I was excited to hear it was a movie until I heard that Eli Roth was doing it.

He won't do it justice. Or at least I don't except him to. I hope I'm DEAD wrong.

Why do you think that (not trying to start a fight, I don't know the guy) ?  Do you think all of his movies just suck?  Is there one particular thing he does? 



BSWeichsel

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Reply #10 on: July 09, 2007, 01:52:34 AM
I don't think his movies suck I really enjoyed Cabin fever. But with hostel and Hostel 2 I thought they was just kind of point less.

But heres what he said when he annouced he had the the rights

"I fucking LOVE that book. Such a smart take on the zombie movie. I am so psyched to do it. I think you can really do almost a cross between the Dawn of the Dead remake with a 'Roland Emmerich' approach (for lack of a better reference) where you show it happening all over the world. When the pulse hits, I wanna see it hit EVERYWHERE. In restaurants, in movie theaters, at sports events, all the places that people drive you crazy when they're talking on their cell phones. I see total armageddon. People going crazy killing each other - everyone at once - all over the world. Cars smashing into each other, people getting stabbed, throats getting ripped out. The one thing I always wanted to see in zombie movies is the actual moment the plague hits, and not just in one spot, but everywhere. You usually get flashes of it happening around the world on news broadcasts, but you never actually get to experience it happening everywhere. Then as the phone crazies start to change and mutate, the story gets pared down to a story about human survival in the post-apocalyptic world ruled by phone crazies. I'm so excited, I wish the script was ready right now so I could start production. But it'll get written (or at least a draft will) while I'm doing Hostel 2, and then I can go right into it. It should feel like an ultra-violent event movie"

So thats why I'm not looking forward to. He looks like he's only interested in the first like 3 chapters of the book if thats what he wants to do write his own zombie script.

It just frustrates me. He can make genre films but nothing else or if he can I haven't seen it in him.

Since it began, who have you killed? You wouldn't be alive now if you hadn't killed somebody.


Planish

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Reply #11 on: July 10, 2007, 05:51:52 AM
I thought that the notion that the nights were safer than day for travel, and the idea of the cell zombies all gathered in brightly-lit stadiums at night, was a refreshing change from the usual.

Using the cell network to propagate the zombification signal makes perfect sense too. Most people on cell phones in public look like they're only 10% here anyway.

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Planish

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Reply #12 on: July 20, 2007, 07:07:46 AM
I feel he has changed as an author.  And I like the change.
I imagine that with his financial situation pretty well established, he can afford to take chances and Write Whatever He Damn Well Pleases, even if a few books in a row tank as far as sales are concerned. That has to be somewhat liberating for an author who wants to try out some different ideas.

I think he has improved in recent years, even though I thought "The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon" and "Dreamcatcher" were real snoozers for me. His crossover story arcs about the Crimson King (even outside of the Dark Tower series) was probably one of those indulgences that he could take a chance on alienating his Constant Readers.

Heinlein sorta' did the same thing, but I found most of his later works (eg. "Number of the Beast") getting to be tiresome. He took fewer risks.

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Leon Kensington

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Reply #13 on: July 21, 2007, 03:15:13 PM
I thought it was okay, it got kinda trip after they arrived at the college (I don't think that is a spoiler) but what was great was his new take on zombism(sp).



Tango Alpha Delta

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Reply #14 on: January 27, 2008, 06:28:34 PM
**Minor Spoilers Warning***

I couldn't decide with this one whether I was disappointed that he didn't let us find out where the Pulse came from, or if I was relieved that he didn't spoil the suspense with an answer.  Being King, I figured it would almost have to be a Crimson King-related thing, or something to do with aliens.  I don't care for open endings, in general, but by the last couple of chapters, I was resigned to it.


Has anyone seen the new one, yet?  "Duma Key"?  I'm at a point where I feel obligated to read everything the man writes, now, simply because I've read everything the man has written to this point.  It's not even a matter of like or dislike anymore... it's more like getting to hang out with an old friend and seeing what's on his mind.  Sometimes I come away feeling inspired by certain ideas or images, sometimes I feel thrilled by the story, and sometimes I just come away worried about his health.

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gelee

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Reply #15 on: January 28, 2008, 05:57:34 PM
**Minor Spoilers Warning***

I couldn't decide with this one whether I was disappointed that he didn't let us find out where the Pulse came from, or if I was relieved that he didn't spoil the suspense with an answer.  Being King, I figured it would almost have to be a Crimson King-related thing, or something to do with aliens.  I don't care for open endings, in general, but by the last couple of chapters, I was resigned to it.


Has anyone seen the new one, yet?  "Duma Key"?  I'm at a point where I feel obligated to read everything the man writes, now, simply because I've read everything the man has written to this point.  It's not even a matter of like or dislike anymore... it's more like getting to hang out with an old friend and seeing what's on his mind.  Sometimes I come away feeling inspired by certain ideas or images, sometimes I feel thrilled by the story, and sometimes I just come away worried about his health.
I have bought "Duma Key", and it's in my "read" pile.
I DO buy everything the guy publishes, have since high school.  What I've always loved about his writing is...well...his writing.  His story lines and plots can be just awful sometimes, but I love the way he uses the language.  I'm re-reading 'Salem's Lot right now.  The way he describes the changing of the seasons, or small town life, or the art of growing old would have done Whitman proud.  I also love the characters he builds.  I don't think I've ever read anyone who does a better job creating people you can believe: complicated, full of contridictions and personal flaws, but deeply personal. 



afterburnsf

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Reply #16 on: May 15, 2008, 03:32:28 PM
and sometimes I just come away worried about his health.

Duma Key seems to have a lot of Cathartic elements about physical trauma and recovery from it.  I think he's blending his physical recovery with recovery from traumatic brain injury that, Frank Muller,the narrator of many of his audio books, experienced.

The story really involved me and I finished the book in about five days.  I'd say it's got classic King elements with a decidedly different seasoning.


Tango Alpha Delta

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Reply #17 on: May 16, 2008, 03:15:07 AM
I concur.... good book (Duma Key).  My boss was "reading" it on his 1+ hour daily commute, and when I dragged the tome in and plopped it on my desk, he got all excited.  (That promotion is in the bag, baby!)

But seriously, as was said earlier, it's King's writing that captured me.  I suppose if I'd really put my mind to it, I could have figured out some of the major plot points and anticipated a lot more than I did... but I didn't *want* to.  I wanted to just get carried away with the narrator, and experience his sense of wonder along with him.

Well-paced, and I have to admit, he ended it in exactly the right spot.  (The last line seemed funny to me, considering how hard a time King usually has with endings.  "Yeah, Steve, you nailed it.  Good job.")  :D

This Wiki Won't Wrangle Itself!

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goatkeeper

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Reply #18 on: May 16, 2008, 07:17:30 PM
(I'm one of the six people on the planet quite fond of Reign of Fire for example)

I'm one of those 6...and probably the sole owner of the playstation 2 game as well.



Alasdair5000

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Reply #19 on: May 16, 2008, 09:16:57 PM
I am no longer alone!

I have, it must be said, gone through a phase where a growled 'Two glahnds...in the maaath...GOOD luck' was code for a potentially hopeless situation whilst 'We're going to LONDON!' was a default psyched up phrase at the store for a while.




MacArthurBug

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Reply #20 on: May 19, 2008, 09:12:22 PM
I loved this book.  It sort of felt like a true honest let's vent some spleen project. Mr. King noted that He personally dosn't own a cell phone. I also don't (I tell people I'm allergic). So I COMPLEATLY get the desire to make the darn things evil zombie creating horror show monstrosities. I liked the flow of the book, and personally LIKED the open ending. But then.. I've been reading Stephen King a long time and am willing to give the man plenty of creative nudge room so long as he comtinues to WRITE!

Oh, great and mighty Alasdair, Orator Maleficent, He of the Silvered Tongue, guide this humble fangirl past jumping up and down and squeeing upon hearing the greatness of Thy voice.
Oh mighty Mur the Magnificent. I am not worthy.